The arts tax and its impact on arts organizations

We asked some arts organizations to tell us how the Arts Education & Access Fund, the so-called “arts tax,” is making a difference. Here’s what they told us:

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“The arts tax has helped us develop our ArtsHub, providing crucial performance, rehearsal and administrative space to ten Resident Companies and dozens of very small and emerging organizations at deeply reduced fees. Many of these fledgling organizations serve underrepresented artists and audiences.” –Artists Repertory Theatre

“Last year, the Hollywood Theatre taught filmmaking and storytelling to more than 2,000 underserved Portland students and brought the 70mm film experience back to the big screen for tens of thousands of Oregonians.  Support from the community through arts tax funding made all of that possible.” –Hollywood Theatre

“Artists with Down Syndrome or Autism or cerebral palsy – where have they been? They’ve been here all along, and the arts tax has helped support these artists in growing, in connecting with opportunities to learn and work, and with the chance to lead the kind of full, creative, independent lives that we all want to live.” –PHAME

“The arts tax has enabled the Portland Art Museum to expand programs that reach veterans, LGBTQ youth, Latino youth, people with dementia and their caregivers, and the blind and low vision community, among others. It also helps support free or reduced-price admission to nearly one-third of visitors, including all school groups and children age 17 and under.” –Portland Art Museum

“Last season 8,000 students attended a play at Portland Center Stage. 3,000 were from Title I schools and came for free. The arts tax helped make that happen.” –Portland Center Stage

 

To share your story, contact jhawthorne@racc.org.