RACC Blog

Applications available for RACC Arts Equity grant opportunity; letters of interest due February 22

PORTLAND, ORE — With funding from Multnomah County and the City of Portland’s voter-approved Arts Education and Access Fund, the Regional Arts & Culture Council (RACC) will invest a total of $100,000 in nonprofit organizations that are providing arts and culture programs and services for marginalized communities, including geographically underserved neighborhoods; communities of color, immigrants, and refugees; persons with disabilities; LGBTQ  communities; homeless and houseless communities; and other under-represented populations.

Nonprofit organizations that are based in the City of Portland and/or Multnomah County are encouraged to submit proposals for artistic programs and projects occurring between July 1, 2017 and June 30, 2018. To begin the application process, organizations should submit a Letter of Interest form (LOI) in RACC’s online grant portal at racc.culturegrants.org by Wednesday, February 22 at 5:00 p.m. Applicants whose LOIs best meet the objectives of this grant program will be invited to submit a full application in March.

Grant awards will be announced in May, and will range from $1,000 to $7,000 each. The types of activities that RACC intends to fund include, but are not limited to:

  • Events or programs that give underserved artists increased outlets to promote and market their work
  • Programs that provide technical assistance and other learning opportunities for artists in culturally specific communities
  • Arts programming within underrepresented communities
  • Community events that highlight and promote the art and culture of a particular community

“We are excited to offer the RACC Arts Equity Grant again,” said RACC Grant Officer Helen Daltoso. “After launching the online application process and increasing the grant budget in 2016, we saw an incredible amount of interest from the community,” Daltoso added. All guidelines and application materials are available online at racc.culturegrants.org.

RACC provides one-on-one assistance to applicants as needed, including feedback on draft applications and letters of interest. Upon request application materials can also be provided in other languages and formats. Contact Jack MacNichol at 503-823-2928 or jmacnichol@racc.org for more information.

RACC will also host two free information sessions to help community members learn more about the Arts Equity Grant and how to apply:

  • Thursday, February 9, 6-7:30 p.m. at Gresham Library, 385 NW Miller Avenue, Gresham
  • Saturday, February 11, 2-3:30 p.m. at RACC Offices, 411 NW Park Avenue, Suite 101, Portland
  • If you would like to attend an information session, please RSVP online at racc.org/grants or call us at 503-823-2928.

For more information about the Arts Equity Grant, and a summary of other grant programs and deadlines, visit racc.org/grants.

Key deadline: Wednesday, February 22, 2017 by 5:00 pm – LOI due online at racc.culturegrants.org.

How Arts Equity Grants are funded:

  • $50,000 is funded by Multnomah County, which increased its general fund investment to RACC for the purpose of expanding arts access and support for East County and other underserved populations.
  • $50,000 is funded by The Arts Education and Access Fund (AEAF), approved by Portland voters in November, 2012. The AEAF funds at least one art or music teacher in every public elementary school in Portland, and funds RACC to bring arts, culture and creativity to life for every Portland resident. For more information, visit racc.org/aeaf.

About RACC: The Regional Arts & Culture Council (RACC) was established in 1995 and is funded by public and private partners to serve artists, arts organizations, schools and residents throughout Clackamas, Multnomah, and Washington counties. RACC provides grants for artists, nonprofit organizations and schools; manages an internationally acclaimed public art program; raises money and awareness for the arts through workplace giving and other programs; convenes forums, networking events and other community gatherings; provides workshops and other forms of technical assistance for artists; and integrates the arts into K-8 curriculum through The Right Brain Initiative. Online at www.racc.org.


Regional Arts & Culture Council elects new board members

PORTLAND, ORE – The Regional Arts & Culture Council (RACC) board of directors has elected four new members. They include:

  • Eve Connell is a writer, editor and trainer of professionals in communications. She is the managing editor of University of Hell Press and visiting professor for various MA/MFA/MBA programs in California and Oregon, including OCAC and PNCA.

         

  • Katherine Durham is vice president, Individual Disability Insurance and Corporate Marketing & Communications, for Standard Insurance Company. Durham’s experience includes 20 years as a leader in a variety of positions in both start-up and Fortune 500 companies.

         

  • Frances Portillo of Portillo Consulting, International is an international independent consultant specializing in Cross-Cultural Communication, Social and Emotional Intelligence and Conflict Resolution. She has worked in over 33 countries as a presenter, trainer, facilitator and coach.

         

  • James Smith is a member of the Fort Peck Sioux Tribe of Montana and a descendant of the Warm Springs Tribe of Oregon. He is currently a Financial Analyst for Morrison Child & Family Services, and volunteers as Treasurer for the Concerned Indian Community.

RACC board officers include Mike Golub, board chair; Phillip T. Hillaire, vice chair; Eileen L. Day, treasurer; Steve Rosenbaum, secretary and Jan Robertson, chair emeritus.

Other continuing RACC Board members include Nik Blosser, Verlea G. Briggs, Raymond C. Cheung, CPA, Representative Lew Frederick, Debbie Glaze, Osvaldo ‘Ozzie’ Gonzalez, Angela Hult, Dana Ingram, Susheela Jayapal, Parker Lee, Linda McGeady, Brenda L. Meltebeke, Anita Menon, Mitchell Nieman, Joanna Priestley, Shyla M. Spicer and Anita Yap.

Board and staff profiles are available online at racc.org/about/staff-board.

# # #

The Regional Arts & Culture Council (RACC) provides grants for artists, nonprofit organizations and schools in Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington Counties; manages an internationally acclaimed public art program; raises money and awareness for the arts through Work for Art; convenes forums, networking events and other community gatherings; provides workshops and other forms of technical assistance for artists; and oversees a program to integrate arts and culture into the standard curriculum in public schools through The Right Brain Initiative. RACC values a diversity of artistic and cultural experiences and is working to build a community in which everyone can participate in culture, creativity and the arts. For more information visit racc.org.


Aaron Whelton’s “Stacked Toroid” in the Portland Building lobby January 17 – February 10

PORTLAND, ORE – Architect Aaron Whelton will present his Stacked Toroid project at the Portland Building beginning January 17th. This room-sized installation is part of Whelton’s design research at Portland State University’s School of Architecture and his ongoing investigation of the physical manifestations of digitally designed architecture.

The installation, titled Stacked Toroid, is site-specific and is designed to fill the lobby gallery space from floor to ceiling. This sculptural figure, the toroid, is a shape resembling a torus (like a doughnut) that is formed from lofted elliptical profiles. Visitors to the Portland Building will immediately notice that the shape of the installation seems to shift significantly as they move past it. Walking a closer elliptical orbit around the object reveals a variety of effects generated from a single detail—stacking—as the structural wood lattice intersects the boundary of the toroid’s surface.

Stacked Toroid combines sophisticated digital design technologies with simple methods of construction and assembly to explore the relevance of manual labor in the age of computation. The simple, primitive act of stacking wood, a utilitarian, space-making impulse, is given new expressive potential by forming a complex, computationally generated figure.

A number of logistical challenges had to be worked out to create Stacked Toroid, the primary one being that it is composed of over 650 individual wood members stacked in precise arrangements, but Whelton’s architectural and public art experience have prepared him well. The entire process of installing the work at the Portland Building has been carefully orchestrated to belie the intense, repetitive physical effort required for its making, and the final result presents the polished “easiness” we expect from digital objects.

Meet the Artist Event: Join us for a chance to meet the artist and discuss the installation in person on Wednesday, January 18th from 4:00 to 5:00 pm.  

About the Artist: Aaron Whelton studied architecture at the University of California, Los Angeles and the University of Kentucky and is currently Assistant Professor at Portland State University’s School of Architecture. His practice includes work on public art commissions where digital design informs new ways of making place. These include the David Campbell Memorial in Portland and several collaborations with the artist David Franklin including the public art project Drift Inversion opening in Denver later this year.

Viewing Hours & Location: The Portland Building is located at 1120 SW 5th Avenue in downtown Portland and is open 8 am to 5 pm, Monday to Friday. Stacked Toroid opens Tuesday, January 17, and runs through Friday, February 10.

The Regional Arts & Culture Council (RACC) manages the 13’ x 8’ installation space in the lobby of the Portland Building and presents installation-based art there year round. For more information, including images, proposals, and statements for projects dating back to 1994, go to www.racc.org/installationspace.

###

The Regional Arts & Culture Council (RACC) provides grants for artists, nonprofit organizations and schools in Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington Counties; manages an internationally acclaimed public art program; raises money and awareness for the arts through Work for Art; convenes forums, networking events and other community gatherings; provides workshops and other forms of technical assistance for artists; and oversees a program to integrate arts and culture into the standard curriculum in public schools through The Right Brain Initiative. RACC values a diversity of artistic and cultural experiences and is working to build a community in which everyone can participate in culture, creativity and the arts. For more information visit racc.org.


Salvador Mayoral IV elected to Emerging Leaders Council

PORTLAND, ORE – Members of Americans for the Arts, the leading organization for advancing the arts and arts education in America, have elected Salvador Mayoral IV as a member of their advisory council for the Emerging Leaders Council. Mayoral will advise Americans for the Arts’ staff on developing programs and services that will build a deeper connection to the field and the network membership.

In the Emerging Leaders Council, Mayoral will work with fellow arts leaders to assist in developing programs and resources to promote professional development and networking opportunities for emerging arts professionals nationwide.

With over a decade working in the arts and culture sector, Mayoral is committed to championing both the arts and the culturally diverse communities that create them. He currently serves the Portland metropolitan area in his role as the Public Art Program Assistant at the Regional Arts & Culture Council.

“Americans for the Arts strives to cultivate the next generation of arts leaders in America, and I am pleased to welcome Salvador Mayoral IV to our advisory council,” said Robert L. Lynch, president and CEO of Americans for the Arts. “These leaders are willing to dedicate their time and expertise to work with peers across the country to shape national programs and messages and help craft services for states, communities, and local organizations. I applaud Mr. Mayoral for his valued contribution and commitment that will undoubtedly improve the state of arts in America.”

Potential council members were nominated in mid-September and were voted on by members of Americans for the Arts through November 14, 2016. Mayoral will serve a three-year term, from January 1, 2017 to December 31, 2019.

“I look forward to joining this group of dedicated and passionate arts administrators and continuing the impactful work the council is achieving,” Mayoral commented.

###

Americans for the Arts is the leading nonprofit organization for advancing the arts and arts education in America. With offices in Washington, D.C. and New York City, it has a record of more than 50 years of service. Americans for the Arts is dedicated to representing and serving local communities and creating opportunities for every American to participate in and appreciate all forms of the arts. Additional information is available at AmericansForTheArts.org.

The Regional Arts & Culture Council (RACC) provides grants for artists, nonprofit organizations and schools in Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington Counties; manages an internationally acclaimed public art program; raises money and awareness for the arts through Work for Art; convenes forums, networking events and other community gatherings; provides workshops and other forms of technical assistance for artists; and oversees a program to integrate arts and culture into the standard curriculum in public schools through The Right Brain Initiative. RACC values a diversity of artistic and cultural experiences and is working to build a community in which everyone can participate in culture, creativity and the arts. For more information visit racc.org.


Dedication of “River Guardian” by Lillian Pitt

The new sculpture River Guardian by Lillian Pitt with Mikkel & Saralyn Hilde will be dedicated on Friday, January 27 at 2:00 p.m.

The sculpture is located on the South Waterfront Greenway adjacent to where SW Penoyer Street meets the Greenway. Additional information will be posted on the RACC Facebook page or call Kristin Calhoun at 503.823.5401.


The next Art Spark is Friday, January 27 at Holocene

RACC’s networking series for artists and arts leaders has been happening and evolving since the spring of 2008. This year, Art Spark will evolve even further as we develop new and interesting events for the arts community to convene and connect beyond the Third Thursday format we have used in the past.

Throughout 2017 we will continue gathering in fun spots throughout Portland, bringing together community partners and holding space for group conversations and other forms of learning. An Art Spark event could be a forum, an open house, a happy hour gathering or a field trip, but whether the form, Art Spark will always endeavor to provide a rich blend of information and inspiration in a social setting.

We also invite community wisdom, so please feel free to tell us how we can help you connect with local artists and arts leaders – and what you would like to see, hear, and learn about in the year ahead. We look forward to seeing you at an Art Spark soon!

Our next Art Spark gathering is January 27th. We hope you will join us!

Art Spark
Friday, January 27, 5:30pm – 8:00pm at Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison.


Happy New Year!

ELOISE’S BLOG:

Saturday night I think many of us will be cheering the passing of this complex and challenging year. What lies ahead for our country is still a murky mystery, but hopefully there will be meaningful ways for creativity, intelligence, respect for all people, and collaboration to help guide us all.

Last week we shared widely our Annual Report for 2016. If you have not seen it and would like to you can find it here.

Looking into our 2017 crystal ball we see some exciting new activities on top of the ever evolving and growing RACC programs. New elected officials in several jurisdictions promise to influence our direction as well. Our public art staff and volunteers will be commissioning art for the new Multnomah County Courthouse downtown and resiting the considerable collection from the old building into county facilities. Work will progress in earnest on the Portland Building overhaul including new public art, and we will welcome many more murals and new pieces for neighborhood parks.

Grants will continue to fine tune all of its programs focusing on efficiencies, accessibility, technical assistance and the sometimes elusive funding increases. Much of RACC’s advocacy will focus on convincing all newly and returning elected leaders to invest robustly in arts and culture, which we know are part of what makes Portland so desirable to live in, do business in and visit. We need to support our artists and arts organizations to stay true to the Portland vibe – now internationally recognized.

Our connections with the business world are expanding in new and productive ways. Watch for information about “Juice” (formerly known as the Arts Breakfast of Champions) on February 8th at 7:30 am, when business and arts leaders will celebrate creative connections, and artists and organizations will be showcased. Work for Art will continue to build on its highly successful 10 year celebratory increase in workplace contributions and host the 2nd annual Battle of the Bands on May 17th. Start practicing!

The Right Brain Initiative continues to grow throughout the tri-county region. Now serving 68 schools – including 27,500 students and their 1,900 teachers – we look forward to expanding our arts integration work even further when another school year begins next September.

Our Board recently held a retreat and committed to focusing time, resources and expertise in our equity work, helping the region with serious affordability issues for artists, arts organizations and all residents, and advocacy for increased funding from the Arts Tax and other sources.

On behalf of the amazing RACC staff and Board thank you for all you contribute to the rich culture of this place and together let’s design a promising and creative New Year!


“Night Lights” presents 2nd Annual Bring Your Own Beamer event

Portland Community Media and The Regional Arts and Culture Council invite artists to participate in a one night projection event.

We provide: power source, walls for projection and limited rain coverage.
You provide : A Beamer and content to project through your beamer. A beamer can be any type of projector or light source.

All content must be original and suitable for a public space.

Several shared digital projectors will be available to artists who have content on a USB drive.

Length of airtime will be determined by number of participants and availability of wall space.

BYOBeamer is a community event aimed at bringing together artists of all levels who have interest in using projection as part of their art making process.

If you plan to bring your own equipment, please be prepared for January temperatures and precipitation.
Night Lights 2nd Annual Bring Your Own Beamer event
Thursday, January 5th 2017, 5-8pm
North wall of RACC’s offices at 411 NW Park Ave, Portland, OR

Direct any questions to William Rihel wrihel@racc.org or Sarah Turner sarah@pcmtv.org.


RACC announces 2017 Professional Development Grants

The RACC Professional Development Grant Program individual artists and arts organizations in Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington Counties with activities that improve their business management development skills and/or brings to them to another level artistically. A total of $39,871 was awarded to 29 individuals and 4 organizations. These grants were approved by the RACC Board on December 14, 2016.

* First Time Professional Development Grant Recipient

Except where noted, recipients are from Multnomah County

 

Individuals

*Alvarado, Amaya – Acrobatic training in Beijing – $1,000

*Bay, Amy – Online mentorship/feedback program – $750

Brock, Charissa – Update artist website – $1,500 (Washington)

*Brown, Ezekiel – Work with fundraising consultant – $1,200

*Bundy, Elizabeth – Update artist website – $1,500

*Burns, Hannah – Present work in Minneapolis – $520

*Cook, Jan – Photo Lucida portfolio review – $750

*Corris, Amy – Tradeshow in Utah – $1,200 (Washington)

*Curington, Susan – Study with master teacher in California – $984 (Washington)

*Fuchs, Jodi – Create marketing plan with consultant – $810

*Green, Cheryl – Audio description training in North Carolina – $1,070

*Gregor, Amarette – Craft jewelry tradeshow in Baltimore – $2,000

*Hanson, Erica – Work with artist coach – $600 (Clackamas)

*Horan, Elisabeth – Residency and exhibition in Maine – $912

*Kemp, Courtney – Residency and exhibition in Denver – $780

*Kilbourne, Kate – Internship in Washington DC – $800

*Lux, Ali – Dance workshops in Jamaica – $1,360

*Mefford, Benjamin – Sculpture exchange program in Japan – $1,500 (Clackamas)

*Pagliarulo, Jane – Etching workshop in San Francisco – $1,800

*Prado, Emilly – Residency in Mexico – $1,430

*Roessler, Sophie – Conference and residency in Toronto – $1,165

*Stewart, Aremy – Residency in Italy – $1,605

*Stull Meyers, Ashley – Residency in Canada – $750

*Tolosa, Consuelo – Work with business consultant – $1,000

*Trail, Jennifer – Photo Lucida portfolio review – $750

*Turley, Austin – Residency in Mexico – $1,595

Walker, Curtis – Study with master artist in London – $2,000

*Wrenn, Rio – Residency in France – $1,000

*Yes, Larry – Create artist website – $1,500

 

Organizations

*Oregon Society of Artists – Continue updates to website – $1,540

*Oregon Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts – Create new website – $2,000

*The Obo Addy Legacy Project – Study dance & music in Ghana – $1,500

*Westside Cultural Alliance – Attend AFTA Conference – $1,000 (Washington)

 

 


RACC awards $733,608 in project grants for 2017

PORTLAND, ORE — The Regional Arts & Culture Council (RACC) has awarded $733,608 in grants to 92 local artists and 52 nonprofit organizations for artistic projects that will take place in calendar year 2017. This represents a 10% increase over last year thanks to increased funding from Multnomah County, the City of Portland and RACC’s workplace giving campaign, Work for Art. Additional funding was provided by Clackamas County, Washington County and Metro.

“As 2016 draws to a close, we can start looking forward to a tremendous variety of innovative arts activities scheduled to take place in 2017,” said executive director Eloise Damrosch. “I am especially pleased that 57% of our grants this year are going to artists and organizations that have never received RACC project grant funding before.”

Some examples of funded artists and organizations that are receiving their first-ever project grant from RACC include:

  • Alan Alexander III, $5,400 in the Theatre category to fund a public performance of an original musical theatre work titled “Homeless (the musical).” Book, music and lyrics by Alan Alexander III with additional music and lyrics by Kathryn Grimm.
  • Irina Boboia, $6,495 in the Multi-Discipline category to fund “Two Worlds and Nowhere,” a project aimed at revealing the stories of local immigrants/refugees through video, still images and text. The project will be disseminated as a video blog, art installation and video screenings.
  • Ashleigh Flynn, $5,600 in the Music category to help create an LP record of self-penned Americana songs inspired by “Rosie the Riveter,” whose brand inspired a social movement in America. The recording will feature a band of highly talented musicians, all female, over 40 years old, and many who identify as LGBTQ, and will culminate in a celebratory performance at McMenamins Mission Theater.
  • Chiara Giovando, $4,838 in the Media Arts category, to support “A Stone, a Stick and a Plastic Soul” (working title) — a new film made in collaboration with contemporary artist and Karuk tribal elder, Brian Tripp. The project is positioned somewhere between documentary and fiction, exploring the unique ways Brian’s life and practice hover between the traditional and the contemporary.
  • Kazumi Heshiki, $5,552 in the Literature category for “Fireweed Blossoms,”a book of haiku-hybrid poetry in English that is the culmination of several years of cross-cultural experimentation under the guidance of local poet Stephanie Adams-Santos. RACC support will help the artist self-publish the book and present it to the public.
  • Jesse Mejia, $6,280 in the Social Practice category for “CHOIR,” an ongoing community singing group focused on learning and performing choral music by composers such as Arvo Part and Ola Gjeilo.
  • Kate Simmons, $4,309 in the Visual Arts category. “Fold the Towel” is a conceptual piece that utilizes the female body to explore ideas of domesticity and the struggles of balancing career and family responsibilities. The finished work funded in part by RACC will consist of 9 images of the figure printed on semi-translucent 8’x6′ fabric panels.
  • Black Women for Peace, $4,833 in the Community Participation & Access category to help present the 2017 Peace Festival, bringing together youth and young adults from diverse racial, ethnic and cultural groups to promote peace through the performing arts and cultural exchange.
  • Q Center / LGBTQ Community Center Fund, $5,250 in the Dance/Movement category to bring the nationally acclaimed Sean Dorsey Dance Company to Portland in the fall 2017 for two performances of “The Missing Generation.” This piece gives voice to longtime survivors of the early AIDS epidemic and RACC funding will also be used to fund a dance workshop; an intergenerational community forum; and a post-performance discussion.
  • Vanport Mosaic, $4,500 in the Theatre category, to produce six staged readings each of “Summer Squash” and “Hercules Didn’t Wade in the Water,” new plays about the American Dream, displacement and Hurricane Katrina. One performance of each show will be brought to a local High School with facilitated discussion afterwards.

RACC’s peer review process involved 46 community volunteers who served on 14 different panels organized by discipline. They were guided by staff during the months of October, November and December, evaluating proposals based on artistic merit, audience development and financial accountability. Most volunteer panelists (96%) served on a RACC grants panel for the first time. The RACC Board of Directors unanimously approved all panel recommendations on December 14.

A complete list of project grants appears below. More detailed summaries of each grant are available at http://bit.ly/RACC2017PG (PDF).

RACC project grants for individuals, calendar year 2017

Note: (*) denotes Clackamas County applicants, and (**) denotes Washington County based applicants.  All other applicants are based in Multnomah County. AF = Artistic Focus and CPA = Community Participation & Access.

 

Applicant Project Type Discipline  Grant Award
manuel abreu CPA Multi-Discipline  $        3,038
Oluyinka Akinjiola AF Dance/Movement  $        4,275
Alan Alexander III AF Theatre  $        5,400
Yulia Arakelyan AF Dance/Movement  $        6,567
Sue Arbuthnot AF Media Arts  $        6,940
Emily Bixler AF Visual Arts  $        5,780
Sundance Bleckinger AF Media Arts  $        5,949
Irina Karin Boboia** AF Media Arts  $        6,495
Wayne Bund AF Multi-Discipline  $        4,934
David Ornette Cherry AF Music  $        5,250
Robin Chilstrom AF Multi-Discipline  $        5,243
Adam Ciresi AF Multi-Discipline  $        5,006
Jeremy Davis AF Visual Arts  $        5,695
Jay Derderian AF Music  $        3,060
Suniti Dernovsek AF Dance/Movement  $        6,999
Daniel Diana-Peebles AF Multi-Discipline  $        3,780
Noah Dunham AF Multi-Discipline  $        5,755
Brenan Dwyer AF Theatre  $        4,275
Wynde Dyer AF Visual Arts  $        5,342
Raquel Edwards* AF Visual Arts  $        5,912
Taylor Eggan AF Dance/Movement  $        2,299
Nancy Ellis AF Dance/Movement  $        2,978
Tiffany Ellis AF Media Arts  $        5,950
Ashleigh Flynn AF Music  $        5,600
Mitchell Freifeld** AF Visual Arts  $        4,560
Anne Galisky CPA Visual Arts  $        5,400
Zoe Gieringer** AF Media Arts  $        2,370
Chiara Giovando AF Media Arts  $        4,838
Joseph Glode AF Visual Arts  $        3,930
Lucas Gray CPA Visual Arts  $        4,313
Jen Harrison AF Music  $        6,593
Erinn Kathryn Hatter AF Visual Arts  $        6,095
Kazumi Heshiki AF Literature  $        5,552
Laura Hughes AF Visual Arts  $        5,760
Carol Imani CPA Literature  $        6,462
Nancy Ives AF Music  $        6,170
Sean Johnson AF Visual Arts  $        3,594
Dawn Jones Redstone AF Media Arts  $        6,648
Yukiyo Kawano CPA Multi-Discipline  $        5,156
Christopher Kirkley AF Media Arts  $        5,112
Isaac Lamb** AF Theatre  $        5,600
Kathleen Lane CPA Literature  $        3,168
Horatio Law AF Visual Arts  $        6,650
Katherine Lewis CPA Theatre  $        5,235
Fuchsia Lin AF Multi-Discipline  $        6,603
Laura Lo Forti CPA Media Arts  $        3,200
Sarah Loose CPA Social Practice  $        6,590
Jonathan Marrs AF Media Arts  $        4,688
Cambria Matlow AF Media Arts  $        6,224
Matt McCormick AF Media Arts  $        5,290
Jesse Mejia AF Social Practice  $        6,280
Pamela Minty AF Media Arts  $        6,132
Lauren Moran AF Social Practice  $        5,040
Dustin Morrow** AF Media Arts  $        5,250
Donal Mosher AF Multi-Discipline  $        3,419
Travis Neel AF Social Practice  $        1,680
Tabitha Nikolai AF Visual Arts  $        3,343
Eric Nordstrom AF Media Arts  $        4,921
Tom Olsen AF Media Arts  $        3,728
Ann Marie O’Malley AF Literature  $        4,081
Rachel O’Rourke CPA Social Practice  $        4,838
Michael Palmieri AF Media Arts  $        5,600
Brian Parham CPA Music  $        5,360
Pepper Pepper AF Multi-Discipline  $        6,479
Carolina Pfister AF Media Arts  $        3,119
Reid Psaltis AF Visual Arts  $        5,600
Sarah Rabeda** AF Visual Arts  $        4,085
Alicia Rabins AF Multi-Discipline  $        6,603
Bonnie Ratner AF Theatre  $        1,955
Denver David Robinson AF Multi-Discipline  $        5,588
Danielle Ross AF Dance/Movement  $        5,468
Jeremy Rotsztain AF Media Arts  $        4,646
Nora Ryan AF Music  $        5,072
Annette Sabater AF Visual Arts  $        4,781
Molly Schaeffer AF Literature  $        4,880
Cameron Schneider AF Multi-Discipline  $        4,500
Lisa Schonberg AF Multi-Discipline  $        4,109
Anna Sell AF Theatre  $        3,338
Kate Simmons* AF Visual Arts  $        4,309
Susan Smith AF Music  $        5,160
Jack StockLynn AF Multi-Discipline  $        5,516
Andrea Stolowitz AF Theatre  $        6,984
Dao Strom AF Multi-Discipline  $        6,622
Sharita Towne AF Multi-Discipline  $        7,000
Matthew Vuksinich AF Music  $        7,000
Holcombe Waller AF Multi-Discipline  $        6,650
Mel Wells AF Literature  $        4,388
Lisa Wilcke CPA Visual Arts  $        2,066
Emily Wobb AF Visual Arts  $        4,875
Jenn Woodward AF Visual Arts  $        3,708
Mike Yager AF Visual Arts  $        1,595
Lu Yim AF Multi-Discipline  $        5,566

 

RACC project grants for organizations, calendar year 2017

Note: (*) denotes Clackamas County applicants, and (**) denotes Washington County based applicants.  All other applicants are based in Multnomah County. AF = Artistic Focus and CPA = Community Participation & Access.

Applicant Project Type Discipline Grant Award
45th Parallel AF Music  $        5,400
Action/Adventure Theatre AF Theatre  $        6,090
A-WOL Dance Collective, Inc. CPA Dance/Movement  $        5,250
Be Space CPA Presenting  $        3,488
Big Horn Brass* AF Music  $        2,360
Black Women for Peace CPA Presenting  $        4,833
Boom Arts, Inc. AF Presenting  $        7,000
Caldera CPA Multi-Discipline  $        7,000
Centro Cultural of Washington County** CPA Social Practice  $        4,238
Circus Cascadia CPA Multi-Discipline  $        6,300
Classical Up Close** CPA Music  $        5,250
Clinton Street Theater LLC AF Media Arts  $        4,875
Color Outside the Lines CPA Visual Arts  $        3,360
Disability Art and Culture Project CPA Dance/Movement  $        6,120
en Taiko CPA Music  $        3,138
Hoffman Gallery of Contemporary Art AF Visual Arts  $        5,250
Know Your City AF Multi-Discipline  $        4,016
Lan Su Chinese Garden AF Visual Arts  $        5,250
Latino Network AF Multi-Discipline  $        5,562
Live On Stage AF Theatre  $        6,055
MediaRites AF Theatre  $        5,600
NAACP Portland Branch 1120B CPA Visual Arts  $        2,400
New Expressive Works AF Dance/Movement  $        7,000
Newspace Center for Photography CPA Visual Arts  $        5,600
Nordic Northwest** AF Multi-Discipline  $        6,650
Northwest Animation Festival AF Presenting  $        6,975
Obo Addy Legacy Project AF Music  $        6,650
Oregon BRAVO Youth Orchestras CPA Music  $        6,000
Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education AF Visual Arts  $        5,822
Pacific Northwest College of Art AF Visual Arts  $        5,600
Portland Community College AF Literature  $           750
Portland Community Media AF Media Arts  $        5,833
Portland Japanese Garden AF Multi-Discipline  $        7,000
Portland Opportunities Industrialization Center, Inc. CPA Multi-Discipline  $        5,250
Portland Oregon Women’s Film Festival CPA Media Arts  $        6,300
Portland SummerFest AF Music  $        7,000
Portland Zine Symposium CPA Presenting  $        2,075
Q Center / LGBTQ Community Center Fund AF Dance/Movement  $        5,250
QDoc AF Media Arts  $        6,255
Resonate Choral * CPA Music  $        4,155
Risk-Reward AF Presenting  $        5,250
Rogue Pack CPA Theatre  $        6,650
S1 Synth Library AF Presenting  $        6,300
Shingon PDX Henjyoji AF Visual Arts  $        6,030
SoulPatch Music Productions* AF Music  $        4,718
Sowelu Theater AF Theatre  $        5,220
Staged! AF Theatre  $        5,225
The Stumptown Improv Festival AF Theatre  $        4,463
The Vanport Mosaic AF Theatre  $        4,500
Washington County Cooperative Library Services** CPA Multi-Discipline  $        5,250
World Stage Theatre CPA Theatre  $        6,095
ZENA ZEZZA AF Multi-Discipline  $        5,250


###

The Regional Arts & Culture Council (RACC) provides grants for artists, nonprofit organizations and schools in Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington Counties; manages an internationally acclaimed public art program; raises money and awareness for the arts through Work for Art; convenes forums, networking events and other community gatherings; provides workshops and other forms of technical assistance for artists; and oversees a program to integrate arts and culture into the standard curriculum in public schools through The Right Brain Initiative. RACC values a diversity of artistic and cultural experiences and is working to build a community in which everyone can participate in culture, creativity and the arts. For more information visit racc.org.


The soul of a city: the arts in Portland

By Nick Fish, Portland City Commissioner

Imagine Portland with no art. No paintings or murals. No Lee Kelly sculptures. No Grimm or Wild or Live Wire. No Jefferson Dancers, symphony and opera in our parks, or production of Our Town. No Mel Brown Quartet. Would you still choose to live here?

Fortunately, art, culture and heritage are woven into the fabric of our city. And this year, we have much to celebrate: a proud history of public and private support for the arts; strong leadership from organizations like the Regional Arts & Culture Council and the Oregon Arts Commission; and an Arts Tax delivering on its promise of enriching the lives of 36,000 elementary school children in six local school districts.

And these issues rose to the top during the Mayor’s race this spring. At a forum on arts and culture, the candidates displayed an impressive depth of knowledge. In the end, Portland elected a new Mayor, Ted Wheeler, deeply committed to arts and culture.

As 2016 comes to a close, we also face many challenges.

Portland is fast becoming unaffordable for artists and non-profit arts organizations. We continue to struggle with translating equity into action. And will a new Republican administration in Washington continue to support public funding for the arts?

Here is my (highly selective) report on the State of the Arts.

RACC

In April, RACC presented its annual “State of the Arts” to the Council. The sounds of Portland Opera and youth singers from the BRAVO Orchestra and Rosa Parks Elementary reverberated through our chambers.

The City of Portland continued to prioritize funding for the arts. This year we contributed $7 million to RACC, about 70% of its $9.7 million budget. If we are to grow the pie, however, our partners also need to step up to support this regional effort.

Under Mike Golub’s leadership, Work for Art, a workplace giving campaign, hit $912,000 this year. I signed up, and not only enjoy the convenience of automatic deductions from my paycheck, but also the added benefit of the Arts Card!

And RACC is fully engaged in the important work of expanding access to the arts and building equity into all of its grant-making. Small community-based arts organizations deserve our support.

The Oregon Cultural Trust

Our vision for the arts extends beyond the region. I once served as vice-chair of the Oregon Cultural Trust. The Trust allows individuals and businesses to support art, culture and heritage statewide, for which they get a tax credit on their state tax return.

2015 saw record fundraising—$4,560,000.  The Willamette Week Give Guide generated over $350,000 in donations. As a result, the Trust awarded nearly $3 million dollars to 149 cultural non-profits. Bravo!

Federal Funding for the Arts

This past year, America celebrated the 50th anniversary of the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). At the bill signing ceremony on September 29, 1965, President Johnson declared that “[a]rt is the nation’s most precious heritage…it is in our works of art that we reveal ourselves, and to others, the inner vision which guides us as a Nation.”

Stirring words. But today, federal funding for the arts and the humanities is very modest, and vulnerable to more cuts. Will President-elect Trump defend the NEA, or will we see a repeat of 1995, when its budget and staff were slashed by fifty-percent?

The Arts Tax Delivers for Kids

The voter-approved Arts Tax had a good year. Collections were up significantly, and revenues will exceed $10 million dollars.

That means 36,000 elementary school kids benefited from arts instruction in school. We know from the Right Brain Initiative that arts education improves student achievement across the board.

The Arts Tax has prevailed in three legal challenges. Now the Oregon Supreme Court has agreed to hear a final appeal. The hearing, which is open to the public, will be held at Lewis and Clark College on March 6th, 2017. We continue to believe the tax is constitutional.

Stan Penkin completed four years of service as the chair of the Arts Oversight Committee. He has been a tireless and passionate supporter of the arts, and we owe him a big debt of gratitude.

The Housing Crisis and Artists

Last year, the Portland City Council declared a housing “state of emergency.” With rising rents and land values, Portland is quickly becoming unaffordable for older adults on fixed incomes, full-time minimum wage workers, students and working class families.

Artists and arts organizations are also feeling the squeeze. The eviction of artists from studio spaces in Towne Storage was the proverbial canary in the tunnel. If we do not act quickly, we risk losing something that can’t be replaced.

I believe it is time to convene a panel of stakeholders, including artists, public-spirited developers, the Portland Development Commission, and RACC to identify solutions.  We should look at best practices in other cities, including incentives, zoning changes, and cutting red tape.

My Personal Highlight Reel

This year, arts and culture once again enriched my life. Here are some of my personal highlights:

  • A student art exhibit at City Hall, featuring fourth graders from Boise-Eliot/Humboldt School. They based their inspiring work on a tour of the Bull Run Watershed.
  • The legendary Dianne Reeves, who headlined the Portland Jazz Festival.
  • Architect Brad Cloepfil’s show at the Portland Art Museum.
  • A screening of Skye Fitzgerald’s documentary, 50 Feet from Syria, at the Portland Film Festival.
  • World-class modern dance performances at NW Dance Project and White Bird.
  • A screening of short films featuring survivors of the Vanport flood, produced by Vanport Mosaic.
  • The designation of Veterans Memorial Coliseum as a “National Treasure” by the National Trust for Historic Preservation.
  • My first visits to the Art Institute of Chicago, the Clyfford Still Museum in Denver, and etown’s studio in Boulder.
  • The Portland 2016 Biennial presented by Disjecta.
  • Portland Institute for Contemporary Art’s TBA:16 Festival, and the celebration of its new home at 15 NE Hancock Street.

I had a cameo role in Artist Repertory Theater’s production of The Skin of our Teeth; was interviewed by Jessica Rand of KMHD Jazz radio about my first encounter with Oscar Peterson, and by OPB’s State of Wonder about the shortage of affordable artist studios; and participated in a City Club forum on the arts at Milagro Theatre.

Sculptor Lee Kelly was named an “Honored Citizen” by the Architecture Foundation of Oregon.  And my friends Walter Jaffe and Paul King at White Bird presented me with their “Angel Award,” a singular honor.

Finally, I visited Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts in Pendleton, Oregon. The collection of prints, made by prominent Native-American artists, is breathtaking.  I met one of the founders, James Lavadour, whose paintings and prints celebrate the natural landscape of Eastern Oregon.

Looking Forward

In 2017, we must continue to build on our success. Complacency is not an option.

Here are some of my priorities for the next year:

  1. Develop a plan to help keep Portland affordable for artists and arts organizations.
  1. Engage our regional partners in supporting the important work of RACC.
  1. Address the systemic inequality in the funding of minority and community-based arts organizations.
  1. Protect Veterans Memorial Coliseum, a civic treasure, for future generations.

A Holiday Toast

For the past three years, I have had the honor of serving as the Arts Commissioner for the City of Portland—following in the footsteps of past champions like Sam Adams and Mike Lindberg.

I have learned that our success depends on vision, leadership and strong partnerships.

Thanks to our dedicated leadership team: RACC Executive Director Eloise Damrosch, Director of Community Engagement Jeff Hawthorne and Board Chair Mike Golub; OCT Chair Carole Morse and Executive Director Brian Rogers; Julie Vigeland and Libby Tower at the Oregon Arts Commission; Tim Williams at Oregon Film; Stan Penkin, Chair of the Arts Oversight Committee; the Cultural Advocacy Coalition; our city’s Creative Laureate, photographer Julie Keefe; and all the volunteer board and commission members.

Thanks to the artists, teachers, and nonprofit arts and culture organizations that call Portland home.

Thanks to the cast and crew of Grimm—for filming over 100 episodes in Portland, and for giving back to the community through the Grimm Gala.

Thanks to Jimmy Maks, for twenty years of featuring the city’s best jazz players.

Finally, thanks to my Council colleagues, our partners throughout the state, and the taxpayers who share our vision.

Portland is a special place because of your collective good work.

 

Visit Commissioner Nick Fish’s website.


Work for Art annual report reviews 10th anniversary campaign

Work for Art, RACC’s annual fundraising campaign for local arts organizations, has released its 2015-16 report of accomplishments and financial summaries.

The report acknowledges more than 1,800 donors and 75 companies who contributed to the program’s most successful campaign yet. A record $912,213 was raised from employee and individual giving, company match, local governments, and special events – including Work for Art’s first annual Battle of the Bands.

In August, RACC and Work for Art recognized the top workplace giving campaigns, and celebrated outgoing co-chairs Mike Golub, president of business at the Portland Timbers, and former regional president of KeyBank, Dave Lofland, for their leadership during the 10th anniversary.

The full report can be viewed online: workforart.org/annual-report-2016.


20th Annual City and County employee art exhibit opens at the Portland Building December 15

PORTLAND, ORE – The Regional Arts & Culture Council will be hosting the 20th annual City of Portland and Multnomah County employee art exhibit, all the art that fits, opening on Thursday, December 15. The exhibit will be held in the Portland Building lobby Installation Space and is a yearly favorite for both the artists and regular visitors.

Only original artwork created by current employees of the City or County is eligible. All the artwork submitted will be installed salon style—wall-to-wall, floor-to-ceiling. For those eligible and interested in participating, submissions must be dropped off Wednesday, December 14th, between 8:00 and 10:00 a.m., at the Portland Building lobby located at 1120 SW 5th Ave. between SW Main and SW Madison. See guidelines at http://bit.ly/2gPyaav.

RACC will also invite exhibit visitors to vote for their favorite artwork as part of the People’s Choice Award. To celebrate the exhibit’s 20th anniversary, the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place winners will each receive a special prize. The exhibition will run through Monday, January 9th, and the People’s Choice Award winners will be announced on January 10th, 2017.

Viewing Hours & Location: The exhibition is free and open to the public 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday – Friday. The Portland Building is located at 1120 SW 5th Avenue in downtown Portland.

The Regional Arts & Culture Council (RACC) manages the 13’ x 8’ installation space in the lobby of the Portland Building and presents installation based art there year round. For more information, including images, proposals, and statements for projects dating back to 1994, go to www.racc.org/installationspace.

###

The Regional Arts & Culture Council (RACC) provides grants for artists, nonprofit organizations and schools in Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington Counties; manages an internationally acclaimed public art program; raises money and awareness for the arts through Work for Art; convenes forums, networking events and other community gatherings; provides workshops and other forms of technical assistance for artists; and oversees a program to integrate arts and culture into the standard curriculum in public schools through The Right Brain Initiative. RACC values a diversity of artistic and cultural experiences and is working to build a community in which everyone can participate in culture, creativity and the arts. For more information visit racc.org.


AFTA’s Robert L. Lynch Speaks of Hope, Unity, and Resilience at the End of This Presidential Election

Issued by Americans for the Arts November 9, 2016.

I congratulate President-Elect Donald Trump and all of the national, state, and local elected leaders across the country who won their elections last night. I also thank Secretary Hillary Clinton for her hard-fought campaign, along with all the candidates who did not win but participated in our great democracy by running for elected office.

The historic election of Donald Trump as the 45th President of the United States brings some uncertainty in terms of federal support for the arts. President-Elect Trump, in answering questions co-developed by Americans for the Arts during the course of the campaign, deferred to Congress on supporting increased federal funding of the National Endowment for the Arts and other federal funding for culture in general. He also deferred to state and local school districts on maintaining or increasing support for arts education funding. While he does express appreciation for arts education and the arts in his own life, specific policy positions are unknown or undeveloped.

We do know that the President-Elect is very interested in growing the U.S. economy and improving international trade deals. Arts and cultural industries contribute 4.23 percent, or $704.2 billion, of the nation’s GDP. The value added by arts and culture to the U.S. GDP is greater than that of several other sectors, including the construction industry, transportation and warehousing, mining and extraction, utilities, and agriculture. In contrast to U.S. goods and services as a whole, arts and cultural commodities are yielding a trade surplus—of $24 billion. The arts and cultural sector supports 4.7 million jobs, with more than 2.2 million people in the U.S. whose primary occupation is as an artist.

Americans for the Arts, with the support of hundreds of thousands of grassroots arts advocates in every state, will reach out to the Trump transition team and administration to share these economic numbers on the arts and culture. We will work hard to advance pro-arts policies and strengthen our efforts to transform communities through the arts. It is more important than ever that we use the arts to help the economy, our communities, families and children, and our nation to seek hope, opportunity, and ultimately to come together.

President-Elect Trump has said, “…supporting and advocating for appreciation of the arts is important to an informed and aware society. As President, I would take on that role.” We hope for a White House and administration that supports the nonprofit arts community, the local and state arts support infrastructures, as well as independent artists and creative entrepreneurs. Arts policy recommendations that the Americans for the Arts Action Fund has put forward and will continue to fight for include:

  • Increasing federal funding for the arts to $1.00 per capita (an increase from 46 cents per capita);
  • Fully funding and implementing the “well-rounded education” provisions within the Every Student Succeeds Act by strengthening equitable access to learning in the arts;
  • Preserving or expanding charitable tax deduction incentives for giving to nonprofit arts and culture ed-trio.com/buy-levitra-online charities; and
  • Establishing a cabinet-level position for the arts and culture to advise President-Elect Trump on matters such as how the arts impact the economy, diplomacy, education, and the overall well-being of citizens and the nation at large.

As the 115th Congress is sworn in this January, it is also possible that we will see more conservative and bold policies emerge with a single party controlling the House, Senate, and White House. Complex challenges may be ahead that will impact funding decisions and policy priorities, including a possible tax reform overhaul that hasn’t happened since 1986 that could impact charitable giving for nonprofit organizations. However, we look to our bipartisan congressional partners, like the long-standing Congressional Arts Caucus, the Congressional STEAM Caucus, along with new Senate Cultural Caucus leadership with the retirement of Sen. Barbara Mikulski (D-MD), to grow their ranks and press for supporting arts and culture in America. Together with all of America’s pro-arts elected officials and continued grassroots advocacy, we look forward to continuing to build upon legislative successes when the next session of Congress begins in 2017.

Further, last night, pro-arts results came in from a number of ballot initiatives at the state- and local-level. For instance, in Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Denver, Douglas, and Jefferson Counties in Colorado, a ballot initiative—Scientific and Cultural Facilities District (SCFD)—dedicates one-tenth of a 1 percent sales and use tax to cultural facilities throughout the seven-county Denver, Colorado metropolitan area. Voters overwhelmingly supported extending this through 2030, which currently generates about $55 million a year. The SCFD was first authorized in 1988 and has since been reauthorized twice in 1994 and 2004, respectively. It is local efforts like these that can make real impact in communities all across America. Several arts education funding referendums were also overwhelmingly passed last night by voters in Pinellas County, Florida and Tucson/Pima County, Arizona.

Americans for the Arts will continue to recognize and advance support for the arts and arts education among the nation’s bipartisan state legislators, county officials, mayors, lieutenant governors and governors through a robust set of partnerships that promote leadership in the arts each year.

It’s also important that those of us in the nonprofit arts sector remember the great strength and resiliency that binds us together. For more than 60 years Americans for the Arts has worked with the infrastructures and governments of our communities to make people’s lives better. And of course the arts have helped our communities in different ways for thousands of years before that.

As President-Elect Trump’s administration takes shape, we will remain engaged to ensure that he and his transition team hear from arts leaders, community leaders, and activists and keep the arts central to the many pressing needs of the country. We will unite and strengthen our efforts to show that the arts represent the best of humanity, and urge President-Elect Trump’s administration to advance pro-arts policies that will impact our society, communities, and generations to come.


Portland Building Installation: 20th Annual City and County employee art exhibit opens December 15

RACC will host the 20th annual City of Portland and Multnomah County employee art exhibit, all the art that fits, opening on Thursday, December 15. The exhibit will be held in the Portland Building lobby Installation Space and is a yearly favorite for both the artists and regular visitors.

Only original artwork created by current employees of the City or County is eligible. All the artwork submitted will be installed salon style—wall-to-wall, floor-to-ceiling. For those eligible and interested in participating, submissions must be dropped off Wednesday, December 14th, between 8:00 and 10:00 am, at the Portland Building lobby located at 1120 SW 5th Ave. between SW Main and SW Madison.

RACC will also invite exhibit visitors to vote for their favorite artwork as part of the People’s Choice Award. To celebrate the exhibit’s 20th anniversary, the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place winners will each receive a special prize. The exhibition will run through Monday, January 9th, and the People’s Choice Award winners will be announced on January 10th, 2017.

Viewing Hours & Location: The exhibition is free and open to the public 8 am to 5 pm, Monday – Friday. The Portland Building is located at 1120 SW 5th Avenue in downtown Portland.

The Regional Arts & Culture Council (RACC) manages the 13’ x 8’ installation space in the lobby of the Portland Building and presents installation based art there year round. For more information, including images, proposals, and statements for projects dating back to 1994, go to www.racc.org/installationspace.


Double your donations for free, Oregon

Thank you for supporting the Regional Arts and Culture Council, Work for Art and The Right Brain Initiative. We invite you to keep track of your donations to all cultural nonprofits in Oregon. If you match the total with a gift to the Oregon Cultural Trust, you receive a 100 percent tax credit on your gift to the Trust!* That’s right, you double the impact of your cultural donations for free!

Oregonians fund the Cultural Trust. The Trust in turn, funds the artists, potters, rappers, acrobats and dreamers who make Oregon, Oregon. Every year they disperse funds via the state’s 1,400+ cultural nonprofits, 45 county/tribal coalitions and five statewide partners. Learn more at CulturalTrust.org

Donate by December 31, 2016.

*You can donate all you like to The Trust, but the tax credit is limited to $500 for an individual, $1,000 for a couple and $2,500 for C-class corporations.


2017 RACC Workshops – photo credits

Below are the photo credits for the photography featured on the 2017 RACC Workshop postcard:

pcs_dreamgirl_patrickweishampel-200x200
Deena Jones from Dreamgirls, Portland Center Stage at the Armory. (Photo by Patrick Weishampel)

 

milagro_mexicandancers_russelljyoung_200x200
Mexican Dancers, Miracle Theatre/Milagros. (Photo by Russell J. Young)

mural_paintoutside_200
aptART’s Paint Outside the Lines campaign, Kevin Ledo + students of David Douglas High School, 2016

The Portland Ballet, Spring Program
Ballet/Tambourine guy, The Portland Ballet. (Photo by Blaine Truitt Covert)

pnca_center-for-design200x200
“Office” photo, PNCA Center for Design


Next Night Lights is on December 1

NIGHT LIGHTSSt. Julian the Hospitaller: Second and Third Chances on December 1st , 5pm-8pm

The Portland Community College Painting Team will be presenting a visual adaptation of Gustave Flaubert’s short story, The Legend of St. Julian the Hospitaller, a retelling of the medieval folk tale about self-transformation and personal redemption.  With visual asides to Ivan Albright’s painted iterations of an aging Dorian Gray, PCC painters will be animating a series of still photographs showing a single painting undergo dramatic changes, paralleling Flaubert’s hallucinatory description of events.

Participating artist are students from Painting I&II classes that are part of the Visual and Performing Arts Department at Portland Community College’s Sylvania campus instructed by Mark Smith.

Lead Painter

Shannen Muhl

Featured Artists

Courtney Allan

Emma Buckle

Luisa Carrillo

Sami Chesborough

JD Corral

Adolfo Gonzalez

Addie Groendes

Daisy Hammock

Shyanne Henry

Amy Jack

Brooke Johnson

Tamara Kharchenko

Cole Krikac

Stephanie Luerken

Mayumi Maeda

Jessica Martinez

Marilyn Navarro Yoves

Donna Robichaud

Oliver Rock

Julian Roth

Cali Schmeckpeper

Ariana Stanley-Krause

Paul Thomas

Kat Vanegas

Gabby Walder

RACC and Portland Community Media sponsor this event. The screening takes place on the north wall of RACC’s offices at 411 NW Park, Portland. Screens at dusk.


Artist Alex Luboff’s provocative installation “Pipelines” goes on display at the Portland Building November 14 to December 9

PORTLAND, ORE – Beginning November 14th artist Alex Luboff will present an installation at the Portland Building that offers visitors a timely reminder of how extractive energy infrastructure is confronting communities in Oregon and across the continent. His series of meticulously hand-crafted wooden pipelines, unavoidable as they cleave and intersect the exhibition space, can be seen as craft objects, or as a design composition, but the reference to the imposing physical presence that pipelines represent in our landscape is unavoidable.

Luboff’s project highlights the large scale systemic obstructions dealt to nature and society by the continued expansion of extractive energy infrastructure through this metaphor of “pipeline.” Projects ranging from the Keystone XL pipeline, the proposed LNG terminals and pipelines in Oregon, and the current face-off over construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline are just a few of the growing number of energy infrastructure projects with the potential to significantly alter our surroundings, impact ecosystems, and force communities into confrontation with government, industry, their fellow citizens, and a swiftly changing climate.

“As a metaphorical obstruction pipelines represent the immense government and private investments that support fossil fuel based energy—at the expense of directing resources towards other solutions less damaging. As a systemic obstruction these infrastructure projects reinforce a value system that does not prioritize a sustainable and equitable vision for humanity and the planet.”    – Alex Luboff

About the Artist: Alex Luboff works primarily with built and assembled structure to respond to society in the environment. His work as an artist, educator, and woodworker reflects his interest in intersections of craft and human struggle and is influenced and inspired by the stories of change makers, dreamers, and fighters—their acts of courage, their proud, bold, and humble moments. Alex’s practice is driven by a deep belief in the power of experience, working with hands and body, and the learning that takes place beyond words. This extends to his work teaching boatbuilding, sailing, woodworking, and environmental science to teens around the Northwest.

Viewing Hours & Location: The Portland Building is located at 1120 SW 5th Avenue in downtown Portland and is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday – Friday. Pipelines opens Monday, November 14 and runs through Friday, December 9.

The Regional Arts & Culture Council (RACC) manages the 13’ x 8’ installation space in the lobby of the Portland Building and presents installation based art there year round. For more information, including images, proposals, and statements for projects dating back to 1994, go to www.racc.org/installationspace.

###

The Regional Arts & Culture Council (RACC) provides grants for artists, nonprofit organizations and schools in Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington Counties; manages an internationally acclaimed public art program; raises money and awareness for the arts through Work for Art; convenes forums, networking events and other community gatherings; provides workshops and other forms of technical assistance for artists; and oversees a program to integrate arts and culture into the standard curriculum in public schools through The Right Brain Initiative. RACC values a diversity of artistic and cultural experiences and is working to build a community in which everyone can participate in culture, creativity and the arts. For more information visit racc.org.


“Hands Up”

Eloise’s Blog:

The August Wilson Red Door Project has been presenting a truly powerful and unforgettable production here in Portland over the past 6 months. Everyone I have talked with who has experienced Hands Up has been moved in ways new and startling to them. The play is a collection of monologues written by 7 Black playwrights and acted by 7 Black actors all in response to police shootings of Mike Brown in Ferguson, MO, John Crawford III in Beavercreek OH and way too many other young Black men and women.

RACC is honored to join other underwriters in investing in this work and sharing this experience, not just the monologues themselves, but also the “talk backs” afterwards. The night that I attended, along with a group of RACC Board and staff, the talk back was extremely spirited, sometimes confrontational, and eye- and mind-opening.

The show moves around town and the region made possible by a very simple and portable set. Both public and private investments support this important work, and there will be more public performances scheduled in the weeks and months ahead, including November 17 at PCC Cascade, and December 2 and Wieden+Kennedy. Tickets are free but they often get snatched up within hours of being announced; subscribe to the August Wilson Red Door Project newsletter at http://reddoorproject.org/contact/newsletter to get the most timely notification when performances are added.

I hope you will be able to see this show and participate in the conversation. Please don’t be daunted if it takes you a while to get tickets. It will be worth it.