RACC Blog

Abigail McNamara’s “Ritual, 660’” installation opens at the Portland Building August 11th

PORTLAND, ORE – Ritual 660’, a deftly crafted installation by artist Abigail McNamara, engages the observer’s aesthetic senses while it asks us to contemplate a largely unconsidered aspect of our workday world. McNamara’s installation, which opens August 11th at the Portland Building, employs a floor to ceiling wall of string—each strand coated with beeswax and pigment—to elegantly graph the pedestrian traffic at one of the city’s busiest downtown building complexes.

“The patterns of the working world are carefully constructed. We follow the familiar pathways of prescribed norms—nine to five, Monday through Friday, one hour for lunch. The masses move together along this framework. I am examining this strict human-made structure to reveal the organic forms which underlie it.”

Each string in Ritual, 660’ represents a single minute of a day at the Portland Building. From 7:00 am to 6:00 pm on June 29, 2014, McNamara observed all of the comings and goings through the building’s entrance. To give form to her findings, she devised the floor to ceiling string-graph and waxed the individual strands to indicate the size of the flow both in and out of the doors. Those entering were indicated above a knot in the string, thoseexiting were indicated below the knot; colored form was placed within the strings to expose the shape of the daily migration.

McNamara sees her installation as a way to comment on the organic patterns and forms that can be derived from our daily lives:

“Activity ebbs and flows within the established workday. Bodies move in swarms or in solitude along currents. The shapes of these movements oppose the rigid structure of the work week. Paths build upon one another as each person moves in, out, and through the building. Individuals gradually flow from here to there and the populace of the building swells and shrinks like changing tides.”

About the Artist:  A native of Missoula, Montana, Abigail McNamara received her B.A. in Studio Art from Lewis & Clark College in 2012. She has exhibited her work nationwide and recently received a Career Opportunity Grant from the Oregon Arts Commission to support the execution of her upcoming installation at Duplex Collective in Portland.  In 2013, she was selected as an artist-in-residence by Brush Creek Foundation for the Arts as well as Grin City Collective. She currently works and lives in Portland.  For additional information and images of her work visit: abigailmcnamara.com

Viewing Hours & Location: The Portland Building is located at 1120 SW 5th Avenue in down-town Portland and is open 8 am to 5 pm, Monday – Friday.

For more information on the Portland Building Installation Space, including images, proposals, and statements for all projects dating back to 1994, go to www.racc.org/installationspace.


Work for Art celebrates 2013-14 campaign results

Work for Art raised $776,007 in its eighth annual campaign according to honorary chair Jeff Harvey, president and CEO of Burgerville. A total of 1,965 donors participated in the 2013-14 campaign, helping Work for Art surpass last year’s total by 2%. Harvey announced the results on Wednesday evening at a special reception at Portland Center Stage with 140 arts and business leaders in attendance.

“The money raised through Work for Art over the past 12 months will directly contribute to the quality, richness and fulfillment in our daily lives,” Harvey said. “More and more we measure our impact as companies and individuals in these broader terms. Work for Art and the RACC are important partners in this work, and we are grateful to everyone who supported the arts through this year’s campaign.”

The majority of Work for Art revenues (53%) come from workplace giving campaigns, including employee donations and corporate matching gifts. Portland General Electric raised the most money for the third year in a row, up 3% over last year for a total of $85,794; President and CEO Jim Piro accepted an award on the company’s behalf. For the fifth year in a row, Burgerville won an award for the highest employee participation, accepted by chief cultural officer Jack Graves.

Cambia Health Solutions received special recognition as the Best New Company, including a $50,000 contribution from the Regence Fund of The Oregon Community Foundation; Regence’s market president Angela Dowling accepted Cambia’s award. Portland Opera was acknowledged as the RACC-funded organization that raised the most money for the Work for Art Community Fund and the Arts Education Fund. A full 100% of the proceeds to these two funds are passed on to arts organizations in Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington Counties through RACC’s existing competitive grant programs.

All of the top 15 campaigns were recognized on Wednesday evening. They include:

  1. Portland General Electric
  2. The Standard
  3. Cambia Health Solutions
  4. NW Natural
  5. Burgerville
  6. OHSU
  7. State of Oregon employees
  8. ZGF Architects
  9. KeyBank
  10. City of Portland employees
  11. Stoel Rives
  12. Multnomah County employees
  13. Metro employees
  14. Umpqua Bank
  15. Portland Timbers

Carole Morse, former president of the PGE Foundation, received special recognition (and a standing ovation) for role as a leading champion of Work for Art over the last eight years. Since 2006, Work for Art has raised a total of $5.4 million for the local arts community.

Although Work for Art is primarily a workplace giving program, anyone can participate by making a donation online at workforart.org. Donors who pledge $60 or more receive an Arts Card, which provides a full year of two-for-one tickets at hundreds of local arts events. All donations up to $5,000 are matched dollar-for-dollar by a matching challenge fund that last year included contributions from The City of Portland, Clackamas, Multnomah, and Washington counties, The Regence Fund of the Oregon Community Foundation, the Portland Timbers, and KeyBank. 

Participants are already gearing up for another big campaign in 2014-15, with a goal of raising $790,000 by June 30, 2015. Mike Golub, president of business operations for the Portland Timbers, will serve as Honorary Chair, with David Lofland, market president for KeyBank Oregon & Southwest Washington serving as Co-Chair. Company leaders who would like to conduct an employee giving campaign for the arts, or help contribute to the campaign in other ways, are invited to contact Kathryn Jackson, Work for Art Manager at 503-823-5424 or kjackson@racc.org.


Americans for the Arts recognizes “Streetcar Stop for Portland” and “Inversion +/-” among the country’s most outstanding public art projects

PORTLAND, ORE – Americans for the Arts (AFTA) has recognized 37 outstanding public arts projects completed in the United States in 2013, including two artworks managed by the Regional Arts & Culture Council.  A total of 345 projects from across the country were submitted to AFTA for consideration for this year’s Public Art Network Year in Review, the most prestigious national honor in public art.

  • Streetcar Stop for Portland by artist Jorge Pardo located just north of the Rose Quarter, at NE Broadway and Weidler. The eccentric multifaceted structure includes over 300 individual panels in shades of gray and brown on the exterior, with warm hues of orange and yellow on the interior, sheltering streetcar passengers and marking the stop in a highly visible and fantastically colorful way. Pardo’s creation provides a “rainy on the outside, sunny on the inside” experience for Portland’s Streetcar riders. The inspiration for the exterior palate derives from an evening photograph Pardo took and then simplified and mapped onto the surfaces. He intended the piece to be best appreciated when it is dark and rainy and the interior lighting creates a warm glow that stands out like a beacon amongst its dark surroundings.
     
  • Inversion +/- by Lead Pencil Studio is a monumental scale sculpture in three parts located at the bridge approaches for the Hawthorne and Morrison Bridges in Portland’s Central Eastside Industrial District. The elements draw “ghosts” of buildings demolished in the 1950’s for highway construction, including a cast-iron foundry, a warehouse, and an apartment building. At Hawthorne, two large elements are constructed with a matrix of weathered steel to form the front and back corners of a building. At Morrison the matrix renders the perimeter of the same building form emphasizing the negative space surrounding it.  In reconstructing remnants from the past and building out to the previous property lines, the sculpture explores the scale and complexity of the lost civic fabric.

Streetcar Stop for Portland and Inversion +/- were both funded through the City of Portland’s Percent for Art program, which sets aside two percent of most publicly funded capital construction projects – in this case, the Portland Streetcar’s eastside expansion – for the creation and maintenance of public art.

“We are honored that these two works have been recognized among the country’s excellent and innovative public artworks last year,” said Eloise Damrosch, executive director of RACC. “What I like the most about these two projects is how they engage people along our streets in very different ways – one is human scaled and neighborhood focused, while the other is of much greater size and intended to be viewed from a distance or from below looking upward against the sky. Inversion references the past, while Streetcar Stop is a nod to our future, emphasizing the importance of public transit and sustainability.”

The Regional Arts & Culture Council manages one of the country’s oldest public art programs, with more than 2,000 community-owned artworks in a variety of public places throughout Portland and Multnomah County. The entire collection can be explored online at racc.org/public-art/search and through an iPhone app (publicartpdx.com). RACC and Travel Portland also produce a public art walking tour map for the central city.  In addition to its public art program, RACC provides grants and other services for artists and arts organizations in Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington Counties, and helps teachers integrate the arts into the standard curriculum in K-8 classrooms across the tri-county region. Learn more at racc.org

For a complete list of all recognized projects, click here.


New mural honoring Kirk Reeves to be painted by Gwenn Seemel

PORTLAND, ORE — Over the next two weeks, Portland artist Gwenn Seemel will be working on a mural-sized portrait of Kirk Reeves, the Portland street performer and musician who passed away in November of 2012. The 10’ x 30’ foot mural, funded by RACC, will be painted along the east facing wall of a building on the southwest corner of Grand Avenue and Lloyd Boulevard, formerly the location of Rich’s Deli.   

The portrait will show Reeves in his trademark white tux, black sparkly sweater, his trumpet and red sequined hat. The background will be the musical score for the first few bars of “Somewhere Over the Rainbow,” a song often played by Reeves on his trumpet. The background will contain a rainbow of Seemel’s distinctive energetic marks. 

Reeves regularly performed on the Hawthorne Bridge, playing his trumpet and performing magic tricks to the delight of local commuters. As Gwenn writes on her blog, “…he was always dressed to the nines—white tuxedo with tail, sparkly black sweater, Mickey Mouse hat…He was doing what he loved and he was glad for it.”  Her mural of him will capture his lively presence that was appreciated by young and old alike.

RACC’s public art mural program, financed by the City of Portland, provides funding for murals that reflect diversity in style and media and encourages artists from diverse backgrounds and range of experience to apply. Murals approved through this program become part of the City’s public art collection. For more information, visit racc.org/murals
 
 


RACC announces first round of General Operating Support awards for 2014-15; three new member organizations added

PORTLAND, ORE – Disjecta, Pendulum Aerial Arts, and Portland Jazz Festival will join up to 46 other local arts organizations receiving General Operating Support from the Regional Arts & Culture Council (RACC) in 2014-15. More than $1.1 million will be invested as unrestricted support for many of the region’s most established nonprofit arts organizations.

General Operating Support grants are awarded after a rigorous review conducted by a panel of community volunteers and RACC board members. Organizations are evaluated on artistic excellence and fiscal responsibility, and must demonstrate broad community support including a stable base of audiences and donors. The review also includes an objective third-party financial analysis from the Nonprofit Finance Fund to help measure operating health. 

Starting this year, RACC is transitioning to a new reporting and funding calendar, reviewing organizations soon after they complete their fiscal years rather than all at once. At its June 25 meeting the RACC Board of Directors approved $1,114,301 in funding for 40 groups; as many as nine additional organizations will receive grant awards when their reports are completed and their financial statements are evaluated later this year.

General Operating Support grants are funded by the City of Portland general fund, and by Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington Counties. These organizations will also receive proceeds from RACC’s workplace giving program Work for Art in August, and those that are based in Portland will receive additional funding from the city’s voter-approved Arts Education & Access Fund later this year.

FY2014-15 General Operating Support grants include:

Artist Repertory Theatre, $40,899
Blue Sky Gallery, $10,920
Broadway Rose Theatre Company, $18,500
Cappella Romana, Inc., $11,073
Chamber Music Northwest, $32,815
Disjecta Contemporary Art Center, $9,500
Friends of Chamber Music, $12,972
Hollywood Theatre, $13,335
Imago Theatre, $16,723
Independent Publishing Resource Center, $10,642
Lakewood Center for the Arts, $19,000
Literary Arts, Inc., $31,870
Live Wire! Radio, $11,544
Metropolitan Youth Symphony, $16,649
Miracle Theatre Group, $18,040
Northwest Children’s Theatre, $25,201
Northwest Dance Project, $14,632
NW Documentary Arts & Media, $7,000
Oregon Ballet Theatre, $53,099
Oregon Children’s Theatre, $39,375
Oregon Symphony Association, $133,334
Pendulum Aerial Arts, $7,000
Playwrite, Inc., $10,080
Portland Art Museum/Northwest Film Center, $175,700
Portland Baroque Orchestra, $15,797
Portland Center Stage, $90,027
Portland Columbia Symphony Orchestra, $11,546
Portland Gay Men’s Chorus, $11,199
Portland Jazz Festival, $10,000
Portland Opera, $89,131
Portland Piano International, $10,230
Portland Taiko, $12,195
Portland Youth Philharmonic, $17,480
Profile Theatre Project, $14,483
The Portland Ballet, $10,578
The Third Angle New Music Ensemble, $7,000
Third Rail Repertory Theatre, $10,177
White Bird, $37,740
Write Around Portland, $12,375
Young Audiences of Oregon & SW Washington, $14,440

Organizations that have yet to be reviewed and funded for 2014-15 include Bag & Baggage Productions, BodyVox, Children’s Healing Art Project, Echo Theater Company, Ethos Music Center, Oregon Repertory Singers, PHAME Academy, Portland Institute for Contemporary Art, and Tears of Joy Theatre. For more information, visit www.racc.org/grants


RACC announces arts education job opportunities

PORTLAND, ORE – The Right Brain Initiative, an arts integration program of the Regional Arts & Culture Council (RACC) in partnership with Young Audiences of Oregon and Southwest Washington, is hiring staff and contractors. Current job openings include:

  • Teaching Artists
  • Arts Integration Coach
  • Program Assistant

Additional positions will become available throughout the summer, and complete descriptions will be posted on The Right Brain Initiative’s website at TheRightBrainInitiative.org/join-the-team. Numerous volunteer opportunities are also listed at this site.

The Right Brain Initiative is a community partnership working to transform learning for all children through the arts, creativity, innovation and whole-brain thinking. Right Brain achieves this goal by connecting classroom teachers with local artists in a variety of arts disciplines, and by helping them build creative learning experiences that directly connect to core subjects including language arts, social studies, science and math. In 2014-15 the Initiative will serve nearly 20,000 students, Kindergarten through 8th grade, across seven school districts in Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington Counties.

RACC and Young Audiences value diversity, equity, and inclusivity, and The Right Brain Initiative is committed to ensuring that its staff and artists reflect the diversity of the students we serve. We encourage applications from candidates who can contribute to the diversity of our workforce, and artists working in culturally specific art forms.

These and other local job opportunities in the arts are also listed on RACC’s comprehensive jobs board at racc.org/resources/jobs.


Jesse Taylor’s “Deconstruction Reconstruction: Office” opens July 7th at the Portland Building

PORTLAND, ORE – On the surface Jesse Taylor’s Deconstruction Reconstruction: Office project has a simple premise—deconstruct the contents of a typical office space and rebuild/rework the pieces into a formal, abstract sculptural installation. But the artist’s ultimate intent is a bit more involved. Taylor also sees the labor associated with the deconstruction process as “work of joy” and manages to infuse this into his creation: “The act of deconstruction is, in itself, hard work, but it is labor that contradicts all normal purposes of work, to produce products or services related to our economic system. I approach the deconstruction act with the same kind of energy and intention that I would put into the production of a sculpture.” While the individual elements in Taylor’s abstractions remain recognizable as the building blocks of office furniture and fixtures the re-contextualization and new juxtapositions infuse the bits and pieces with fresh perspective, one based each object’s real, unappreciated, shape, form and texture. The end product here is infused not with the essence of something bound for consumption, like so much of the designed world that surrounds us, but rather bestacnedrug.com becomes something born out of mischief and joy.

About the Artist:  Jesse Taylor just completed his thesis year in the BFA program at Oregon College of Arts and Crafts where he studied under noted installation artists Emily Nachison and Bill Will. While his practice is firmly rooted in sculpture and installation, it often crosses over multiple mediums and draws on his earlier study of computers and visual arts at Portland Community College.

About the Installation Space:  Each year the Portland Building Installation Space series reserves several exhibition opportunities for advanced students in fine art.  The format and presentation requirements for the “student” installations are identical to those for established professional artists, the Regional Arts & Culture Council created this separate eligibility category to help introduce emerging talents to the world of public art. 

Viewing Hours & Location: The Portland Building is located at 1120 SW 5th Avenue in down-town Portland and is open 8 am to 5 pm, Monday – Friday.

For more information on the Portland Building Installation Space, including images, proposals, and statements for all projects dating back to 1994, go to www.racc.org/installationspace.


RACC seeks proposals for artistic projects in 2015

PORTLAND, ORE  – The Regional Arts & Culture Council (RACC) invites nonprofit organizations and individual artists in Multnomah, Washington and Clackamas Counties to submit proposals for artistic projects and cultural events planned for calendar year 2015. “Intent to Apply” forms and applications must be submitted online on RACC’s new GrantsOnline system – racc.culturegrants.org
RACC Project Grants support a wide range of artistic activities throughout the Portland tri-county region.  A wide variety of projects will be considered, as long as they involve the creation or presentation of a performance, exhibit, or other work of art that is available to the general public. Other eligibility requirements apply, and successful proposals will address one of the following objectives:
 
  • Artistic Focus: These projects will demonstrate high artistic quality, innovation, creativity in programming and excellence in artist selection.
  • Community Participation: These projects support cultural and artistic programs with high levels of community participation. Projects in this category should impact participants by providing them with a greater sense of self, family, community and place through learning and participating in their own art making experience.
  • Arts-in-Schools: These projects encourage and enable members of the professional arts community to work in schools and create arts-rich learning environments.
The “Intent to Apply” deadline for Artistic Focus and Community Participation projects is Wednesday, August 6, 2014 by 5:00pm. The deadline to submit an “Intent to Apply” for Arts-in-Schools projects is Wednesday, October 8, 2014 by 5:00pm.
Approximately $750,000 is available for projects in 2015, with awards ranging from $1,000 to $6,000 each. RACC encourages submissions from new, emerging, and established artists alike. All eligible proposals will be grouped by discipline and adjudicated by a panel of community volunteers with interest and experience in arts and culture programming. For more information on how panelists are selected, visit http://racc.org/grants/being-a-grant-panelist.
A program overview and a list of projects that were funded in 2014 are available online at www.racc.org/grants. All applications are processed through RACC’s new online grants system at racc.culturegrants.org, and RACC provides computer access and technical support for people who require assistance. Please note that all grant applicants will need to create an account in the new GrantsOnline system, regardless of past grant activity with RACC.
RACC staff is available to guide applicants through the process of submitting a competitive application. Returning applicants should contact Helen Daltoso at 503-823-5402 or hdaltoso@racc.org  for assistance. First-time applicants should contact Ingrid Carlson at 503-823-5417 or icarlson@racc.org. RACC also provides over-the-phone interpretation services for people with limited English proficiency; call 503-823-5071.
In addition to providing one-on-one support, RACC has produced several online video tutorials (available at http://bit.ly/1l6zBfd), and provides free orientation sessions to help applicants better understand RACC Project Grant guidelines and application procedures. 
  • Orientations for individual artists will be held on Tuesday, July 8th and Thursday, July 17th from 2:00 to 4:00pm.
  • Orientations for not-for-profit organizations will be held on Tuesday, July 15th and Wednesday, July 23rdfrom 2:00 to 4:00pm.
  • Orientations for Arts-in-Schools projects will be held on Tuesday, August 26th and Tuesday, September 23rd from 2:00 to 4:00pm.
All orientations will be held at the RACC offices, 411 NW Park Avenue, Suite 101. RACC staff are seeking host organizations to provide additional orientations at alternate locations. Please contact Alfredo Lettenmaier at 503-823-2928 or email alettenmaier@racc.org for more information and to RSVP.
RACC staff will notify applicants via email as to whether their “Intent to Apply” proposal meets the intention of the Project Grant. Final proposals and supplementary materials will be submitted electronically through the online system by August 20, 2014 at 5:00pm for Artistic Focus and Community Participation, and by October 15, 2014 at 5:00pm for Arts-in-Schools. Applicants will no longer be required to drop-off paper applications at the RACC offices.
Awards will be announced in mid-December.

The Right Brain Initiative wins major funding from The Oregon Community Foundation

PORTLAND, ORE – The Right Brain Initiative has received a $210,000 grant from The Oregon Community Foundation (OCF). The Studio to School grants are a new arts education project made possible by the $150 million Fred W. Fields gift to OCF in 2012. The grants were awarded to just 18 non-profit programs across the state.

“We are a foundation that values education – and the arts are a critical component of a complete education. We need solutions for making quality arts education opportunities available for all Oregon’s youth and we believe that our Studio to School partners are part of those solutions,” said OCF President and CEO Max Williams.

The funds will support Right Brain’s rapidly expanding partnership with the Hillsboro School District (HSD) for the next three years. During the upcoming 2014-15 school year, Right Brain will work with 12 HSD schools. Two of them—Eastwood Elementary and Evergreen Middle School—will join through funds from OCF. Right Brain will work with school staff to design dynamic and integrated arts programming for classrooms, with special support provided to art and music teachers.

“We are so pleased to partner with Right Brain to make arts integration a fundamental part of our schools’ work,” said Steve Larson, assistant superintendent, Hillsboro School District. “Right Brain reminds teachers of the reason they became teachers: to inspire children and to engage them in the wonder and discovery of learning.”

The funds will support the creation of a districtwide professional learning community for Right Brain partner principals in the HSD. These principals will share arts integration best practices, and receive coaching from staff at Quatama Elementary, a model Right Brain school. The grant safemdonline.com also affords Right Brain the opportunity to pilot the program model at its first middle school, Evergreen.

Right Brain has been awarded several other multi-year grants this fiscal year. The Collins Foundation and Schnitzer CARE Foundation awarded $150,000 and $30,000 grants to be spent over the next three years. The Meyer Memorial Trust, and James F. and Marion L. Miller Foundation each provided two-year grants of $150,000 and $100,000 respectively.

Private funds currently make up just under 50% of the program’s $900,000 budget. Annual public funders consist of the City of Portland, Clackamas and Multnomah Counties, the Oregon Arts Commission, and the six participating school districts. Find a full list of program donors and partners at www.TheRightBrainInitiative.org/funding.

The Right Brain Initiative is a sustainable partnership of public schools, local government, foundations, businesses and the cultural community, which launched its programming in Portland area classrooms in January 2009, and now serves nearly 14,000 students in 49 schools. The program’s vision is to transform learning for all children through the arts, creativity, innovation and whole-brain thinking. The Right Brain Initiative is a project of the Regional Arts & Culture Council, with Young Audiences of Oregon & SW Washington serving as Implementation Partner. Read more online at www.TheRightBrainInitiative.org.

The Regional Arts & Culture Council is the local arts agency for Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington Counties, providing grants for artists, schools and nonprofit organizations; conducting workplace giving for arts and culture (“Work for Art”) and other advocacy efforts; presenting workshops and other forms of technical assistance; providing printed and web-based resources for artists; and integrating art into public spaces. Online at www.racc.org.


RACC invests in ten nonprofit organizations to expand arts access in Portland

PORTLAND, ORE – The Regional Arts & Culture Council (RACC) has awarded $25,695 in special grants to ten Portland-based nonprofit organizations, using funding from the city’s voter-approved Arts Education and Access Fund (AEAF). The grants are designed to expand Portland residents’ access by investing in organizations that are serving underserved artists, communities of color, immigrants, refugees, Disabled and LGTBQ communities.
“Arts and culture are for everyone, but some people in our community haven’t had equal access in the past because of cultural barriers, financial constraints, geographic considerations, and a number of other reasons,” said Eloise Damrosch, executive director of RACC. “We at RACC have been working to dismantle these barriers with programs like Arts for All; translating our materials into other languages; building new relationships with culturally specific communities; and meeting regularly with residents and organizations in East Portland. Now, with help from the Arts Education and Access Fund, we are honored to support the collective efforts of ten organizations who are specifically working to help more Portlanders participate in the arts.”
The Arts Education and Access Fund generated enough revenue in 2013 for RACC to provide $150,072 in general operating support for 44 Portland-based arts organizations (see our 1/29/14 press release) plus these grants as described in the AEAF tax code: for “nonprofit organizations that are making arts and culture experiences available to more Portland residents, with particular emphasis on programs directed to communities who are underserved by local arts providers.”
RACC issued a Request for Proposals in February of 2014. Twenty-three eligible proposals were received, with requests totaling $116,598. A special panel reviewed and ranked all proposals – its members were Alan Alexander, local musician and RACC board member; Jedidiah Chavez, Ethos Music Center; Kathy Coleman, Disability Art and Culture Project; Eloise Damrosch, RACC executive director; Eric Hormel, Perkins & Company shareholder and RACC board member; Jennifer Kalez, Office of Commissioner Nick Fish; and Cynthia Knapp, RACC director of operations.  
Ultimately the panel recommended three proposals for full funding and seven proposals for partial funding. The RACC board of directors approved the panel’s recommendations on May 28, 2014.
The funded proposals are:
  • Cascade AIDS Project (CAP), $2,000 to present Concientízate, a day long festival in Portland to raise awareness of HIV prevention while celebrating Latino art, music and culture.
  • Center for Intercultural Organizing, $3,000 to host a workshop series and performance developed by CIO’s Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer (LGBTQ) group, Resilient Communities.
  • Fusionarte, $1,495 to present FUSE ME/collect-relate-integrate, a multi-disciplinary one day showcase featuring Latina artists celebrating individuality, the idea of freedom and their becoming identities; challenging clichés and cultural conventions.
  • Know Your City, $3,500 to host De-Gentrifying Portland, an 8-session video production workshop held at Portland Community Media; 10 young people from communities of color will learn production skills and work in pairs to create 5 final videos.
  • Latino Network, $2,750 to present a series of summer workshops for gang-affected youth, the highest risk youth in the Latino community and their siblings, Summer Academia; culminating in an end of summer event for the youth and their parents. 
  • Native American Youth and Family Center (NAYA), $3,800 to present a community event that highlights and promotes the arts and culture of the Native American community at the 2014 Neerchokikoo Honoring Powwow.
  • PassinArt: A Theatre Company/Juneteenth Oregon, $2,000 to present the 2014 Portland Juneteenth celebration—a celebration commemorating the true ending of slavery in America; June 19, 1865—designed for the entire family.
  • ROSE Community Development, $2,350 to engage diverse cultural communities through an interactive place-based project called Lents Grown-Our Stories (LG-OS) by utilizing photography, video, and storytelling to strengthen neighborhood connections and celebrate the vibrant culture of outer southeast Portland.
  • Visegrad Group PDX, $1,000 to host the first International Children’s Day in Portland to honor and celebrate the diverse cultures that exist, co-exist, and thrive in Portland and surrounding areas “through the children’s eyes” with the goal of celebrating children from around the World, all ethnic, cultural, religious and language backgrounds and from any heritage who live in Portland.
  • Zenger Farm/Lents International Farmers Market, $3,800 to present free weekly live music performances, occasional dance performances, and three bilingual poetry readings during the Lents International Farmers Market’s (LIFM) 2014 season.
For more information about the Arts Education and Access Fund visit www.racc.org/aeaf. To learn more about RACC’s equity initiatives visit www.racc.org/equity. Information on the events listed above will be made available at www.racc.org/calendar as they are scheduled.

“Public Displays of Affection,” a temporary installation opens June 2nd at the Portland Building

Portland, Ore – Public Displays of Affection, a participant-driven installation by artists Erica Thomas and Emily Fitzgerald, explores the shifting terrain of relationship building through the lens of the family portrait.

The definition of the family unit is in flux. Opposite-sex, married couples with children now make up less than half of U.S. households, marking the first time this group has dropped below 50% since data on families was first collected in 1940. Nuclear families are no longer the most common family structure, both nationwide and in Portland.

Thomas and Fitzgerald will explore these changing dynamics with their project by transforming the Portland Building Installation Space into a photo studio. There, they will offer people who use and work in the building professional, studio quality portraits of them with their “chosen families.” Participants will be encouraged to think beyond traditional definitions and deeply investigate who they are closest to and what “family” means to them. This could include friends, domestic partners, co-workers, childcare providers, neighbors, ex-spouses, grandparents, godchildren, or any other important relationship they might choose to identify—even choosing to be photographed as an individual is an option. Public Displays of Affection seeks to promote interesting conversations and highlight the relationships between the participants and their chosen families.

About the Artists: Erica Thomas is an artist, filmmaker, writer, and project manager. Her art practice uses installation, performance, and interventions to explore how we construct our lives and values. Her projects examine the ways in which we structure our lives using relationship-building, dialogue, curiosity, and experimentation. Her work attempts to lead participants into authentic, shared experiences for further understanding of ourselves and each other.

Emily Fitzgerald has been a portrait and documentary photographer for the past 11 years, in the fall of 2012 she worked as a field producer for a Magnum Photo Agency project. She has extensive experience photographing people of diverse backgrounds; her documentary work explores relationships, intimacy, and the complex dynamics of family. You can view her work at: www.efitzgerald.com.

Viewing Hours & Location: The Portland Building is located at 1120 SW 5th Avenue in down-town Portland and is open 8 am to 5 pm, Monday – Friday. To schedule a family photo session for Public Displays of Affections contact Emily and Erica at portlandportraitproject@gmail.com From June 2nd to June 27th the artists will be on-site Wednesdays and Thursdays from 3:00-5:00 pm.

For more information on the Portland Building Installation Space series, including images, proposals, and statements for all the installations since 1994, go to www.racc.org/installationspace.


Performing artists invited to apply for RACC’s 2014 fellowship award

Portland, Ore –  The Regional Arts & Culture Council (RACC) is now accepting applications from performing artists working in dance/movement, music and theatre for RACC’s annual artist fellowship award. Applications are now available online at racc.org/grantsonline.
                      
Since 1999, the RACC fellowship award has honored and supported uniquely talented local artists who contribute to the community in very meaningful ways. This year, RACC intends to return to making two awards, with each artist receiving a cash award of $20,000. RACC rotates the recognition among four disciplines every year – performing artists, visual artists, literary artists, and media artists. Past Performing Arts Fellows have included Mary Oslund and Obo Addy (1999), Tomas Svoboda and Keith Scales (2002), Thara Memory (2005), and Robin Lane (2010).
 
Guidelines can be downloaded from the RACC website, and all applications must be submitted online at racc.org/grantsonline. To be considered, applicants must submit an “Intent to Apply” form electronically no later than 5:00 pm, June 18, 2014. Applicants are then required to finalize and submit their online application, and upload all supplementary materials electronically through the RACC GrantsOnline system by 5:00 pm, June 25, 2014.
 
A panel of community representatives with expertise in the fields of dance, music and theatre will select the two fellowship winners. An artist’s involvement in the community will play a significant role in evaluating each application. In addition, applicants must meet several strict criteria in order to be eligible for these highly competitive awards:

  • The applicant must be a professional artist, as recognized by his/her peers, with a minimum of 10 years’ experience in the performing arts.
  • The applicant must have been an Oregon resident for a minimum of 5 years and a current resident of Clackamas, Multnomah, or Washington Counties.
  • The applicant must demonstrate sustained high artistic quality of artmaking.

Other RACC fellows are listed at racc.org/fellows, and they include: Mary Oslund, Obo Addy, Christine Bourdette, Terry Toedtemeier, Jim Blashfield, Michele Glazer, Tomas Svoboda, Keith Scales, Judy Cooke, Michael Brophy, Chel White, Craig Lesley, Thara Memory, Henk Pander, Joanna Priestley, Kim Stafford, Robin Lane, Eric Stotik, Lawrence Johnson and Sallie Tisdale.  
 
 


The Right Brain Initiative releases Brain Food, a creative activity deck for kids

A unique collaboration between non-profit and design industries raises funds for the arts in schools

PORTLAND, ORE — The Right Brain Initiative has released Brain Food, an exploratory activity deck designed for use at home and school by children ages 4 and up. The fifty activities reflect the integrated and creative learning that Right Brain brings to classrooms in the Portland metro area. Right Brain is an arts education partnership of the Regional Arts & Culture Council.

100% of profits from Brain Food sales directly fund Right Brain’s school programming. The decks are currently available for purchase online at BuyOlympia.com, and in person at 11 New Seasons locations, Powell’s Books, and more. Over 1,000 decks have also been donated to teachers at Portland area public schools.

“We are thrilled to provide a product that parents can use to inspire creative exploration and dynamic thinking at home,” said Marna Stalcup, The Right Brain Initiative Program Manager. “The ongoing revenue generated by Brain Food is a creative approach to supporting the day-to-day operations of our program. It’s the ultimate example of commerce for good.”

Brain Food is the result of a unique, three-year collaboration between Right Brain and the Design for Good Committee of AIGA Portland, the professional association for design. Ten local designers were tapped to provide custom illustrations for the deck, and a successful Kickstarter campaign paid for the costs of printing 2,500 decks.

“As designers, we have powerful skills to communicate, activate, engage, and motivate the community around social issues,” said Melissa Delzio, Past Chair of the AIGA Portland Design for Good committee and project lead for Brain Food. “AIGA Portland was honored to partner with The Right Brain Initiative to co-create Brain Food, from idea to final product. The project represents a true example of Design for Good in action. Designers have moved beyond ideation to make a real impact on the community.”

A release event for Brain Food will take place on Wednesday, May 7 at 6pm at Poa Café, a child-friendly space located at 4025 N Williams Avenue in Portland. The event will feature Los Angeles-based children’s author and illustrator Dallas Clayton. Clayton, best known as creator of An Awesome Book!, will present a talk about children and creativity. This event is free and open to the public, and is best for ages 8 and up.

Click here for a complete and continually updated list of Brain Food retail locations.

The Right Brain Initiative is a public-private partnership established by the Regional Arts & Culture Council to bring high quality arts education to all children in Portland area public schools. Launched in January of 2009 with 20 school partners, Right Brain now serves 20 percent of the 110,000 K-8 students in Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington Counties. This school year a total of 14,000 students in 49 schools from six districts are being served. Other partnering districts are Corbett School District, Hillsboro School District, North Clackamas Schools, Oregon Trail School District and Portland Public Schools. The organization is made up of a sustainable partnership of public schools, local government, foundations, businesses and the cultural community, which launched its effort to bring the arts to every child in the Portland area in January 2009. The program’s vision is to transform learning for all children through the arts, creativity, innovation and whole-brain thinking. The Right Brain Initiative is a project of the Regional Arts & Culture Council, with Young Audiences of Oregon & SW Washington serving as Implementation Partner. Read more online at www.TheRightBrainInitiative.org.


The Right Brain Initiative receives third grant from the National Endowment for the Arts

$25,000 grant supports integrated arts programming in public schools

Portland, Ore – National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) Acting Chairman Joan Shigekawa announced today that The Right Brain Initiative, an arts education partnership of the Regional Arts & Culture Council, is one of 886 nonprofit organizations nationwide selected for an NEA Art Works grant. This is Right Brain’s third NEA award, following grants received in both 2011 and 2013.

Art Works grants support the creation of art that meets the highest standards of excellence, public engagement with diverse and excellent art, lifelong learning in the arts, and enhancement of the livability of communities through the arts. The NEA received 1,515 eligible applications under the Art Works category, requesting more than $76 million in funding. Of those applications, 886 are recommended for grants, for a total of $25.8 million.

Right Brain is recommended for a $25,000 grant to improve classroom arts instruction throughout K-8 schools in the Portland metro area. Each school year, Right Brain provides professional development to hundreds of teachers, principals, and teaching artists, providing them with tools to embed theater, music, dance, visual, literary, and media arts into the curriculum. This professional training now helps educators use the arts to meet the expectations of the new Common Core State Standards.

NEA Acting Chairman Shigekawa said, “These NEA-supported projects will not only have a positive impact on local economies, but will also provide opportunities for people of all ages to participate in the arts, help our communities to become more vibrant, and support our nation’s artists as they contribute to our cultural landscape.”

“We are thrilled to have the consistent support of the National Endowment for the Arts,” said Marna Stalcup, The Right Brain Initiative Program Manager. “It is very meaningful to us to keep federal funding in our cadre of public and private funders. It means city, state and national entities are all linking arms to bring the arts to children in our region.”

For a complete listing of projects recommended for Art Works grant support, please visit the NEA website at www.arts.gov.

The Right Brain Initiative is a public-private partnership established by the Regional Arts & Culture Council to bring high quality arts education to all children in Portland area public schools. Launched in January of 2009 with 20 school partners, Right Brain now serves 20 percent of the 110,000 K-8 students in Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington Counties. This school year a total of 14,000 students in 49 schools from six districts are being served. Other partnering districts are Corbett School District, Hillsboro School District, North Clackamas Schools, Oregon Trail School District and Portland Public Schools. The organization is made up of a sustainable partnership of public schools, local government, foundations, businesses and the cultural community, which launched its effort to bring the arts to every child in the Portland area in January 2009. The program’s vision is to transform learning for all children through the arts, creativity, innovation and whole-brain thinking. The Right Brain Initiative is a project of the Regional Arts & Culture Council, with Young Audiences of Oregon & SW Washington serving as Implementation Partner. Read more online at www.TheRightBrainInitiative.org.

The Regional Arts & Culture Council is the local arts agency for Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington Counties, providing grants for artists, schools and nonprofit organizations; conducting workplace giving for arts and culture (“Work for Art”) and other advocacy efforts; presenting workshops and other forms of technical assistance; providing printed and web-based resources for artists; and integrating art into public spaces. Online at www.racc.org.


“In Truth,” an installation at the Portland Building by artist Wendy Given, opens April 28th

Portland, Ore – Continuing her work centered on the production of uncanny and unnerving contemporary photography and sculpture, artist Wendy Given will present an installation at the Portland Building that employs three interactive sculptures designed to usher the viewer towards a face-to-face encounter with themselves. The three works, a “true mirror,” a wishing well mounted at inaccessible height, and a modern representation of a “scrying stone” (akin to a crystal ball for fortune telling), will work together to shuttle the viewer through a set of conceptual reexaminations and offer a chance to reconsider personal aspirations and wishes.

Guided by natural philosophy, history, folklore, myth and magic, Given’s work conjures the notion of interconnectedness and pushes viewers to expand their understanding of how they are seen in the world and consider where they might be headed next.

“Mirrors and wishes have been repeatedly represented and studied throughout the histories of art and literature. Both have elusive, mysterious, and magical traits…I want the work to occupy a place or feeling of familiarity with the viewer, it can be unsettling and at the same time comforting, a humorous position and intense recognition or premonition.”

About the Artist: Wendy Given received her BFA at The Atlanta College of Art; her MFA from Otis College of Art and Design in Los Angeles, she now lives and works here in Portland. She has shown her work locally and nationally and has completed multiple artist residencies on the West Coast, including a 2013 Signal Fire Alpenglow residency in the Mt. Hood Wilderness, and a Caldera Residency in Sisters, Oregon in 2010. To explore her work further visit www.wendygiven.com.

Viewing Hours & Location: The Portland Building is located at 1120 SW 5th Avenue in downtown Portland and is open 8 am to 5 pm, Monday – Friday.

For more information on the Portland Building Installation Space series, including images, proposals, and statements for all the installations since 1994, go to www.racc.org/installationspace.


RACC music forum on April 6 to address the state of music in Portland

Portland, Ore – On April 6, the Regional Arts & Culture Council (RACC) will host a community forum for musicians, bookers, managers, writers, label owners, and all the folks who make music happen in Portland. “Happening! A homegrown local music forum” is an exploratory conversation about how music works around here, and how artists and supporters continue to shape it for themselves. This forum is presented as part of RACC’s 2014 workshop series.
“The idea for this event came from several discussions with musicians who want to connect more, talk about successes and challenges, and smarter ways to work together with all aspects of the music community,” said Becky Miller, RACC’s outreach coordinator and a professional musician herself. “This event will get people in the same room to have these conversations, and we’re optimistic about the impact they can make on the industry.”  
The event will feature a live DJ, time to meet and greet one another, and a panel of seasoned musicians and industry people, including Anna Jensen, Director of Underground Ops at Doug Fir Lounge;  Rebecca Gates,Musician and Artist; Jared Mees, Musician and Label Manager at Tender Loving EmpireMic CrenshawMusician and Co-Manager at KBOO; Ryan WhiteMusic Writer. ​ ​The panel with be moderated byDavid Gluck, Musician, and Artist Services Manager at Rumblefish.
After the panel, participants will break out into smaller groups to discuss a wide array of topics, so all attendees will get the chance to ask questions and be part of a discussion on their interests in music.  
Entry to the forum is available on a sliding scale ($5-$25), and includes a free drink + snacks for the first 50 attendees who register online. For more information and tickets, visit www.racc.org/workshops, or contact Becky Miller at 503-823-5428, or bmiller@racc.org.
Who: The Regional Arts & Culture Council and local musicians
What: Happening! A homegrown local music forum
When: Sunday, April 6, 2014 from 4:00-7:00pm
Where: Dig a Pony, 736 SE Grand, Portland

Artist Jea Alford kicks off a new season of installations at the Portland Building

PORTLAND, OR — New Season at the Installation Space: The Regional Arts & Culture Council (RACC) is pleased to announce a line-up of nine new installations by local artists at the Portland Building Installation Space. Over the next twelve months artists representing a wide range of approaches to art making will be featured in 4 week installments. Since 1994 RACC has managed the Installation Space in the Portland Building (located downtown at 1120 SW 5th Avenue) and has presented some of Portland’s best interactive and experimental media installations.

This year, 53 artists submitted proposals in the Professional Artist category, and 21 applied in the Student category. An independent selection panel reviewed the proposals, and ultimately selected nine site-specific projects that are challenging, topical and diverse.

Jea Alford’s A Prayer for More Equal Distribution of Wealth, which opens March 24th and runs through April 18th, will kick-off this new season. Alford has elegantly re-purposed common trash bags to construct an overhead cascade of prayer flags across the space. Her prayer references both a childhood growing up in poverty and her current experience navigating the upper-middleclass world of art and academia.

Portland Building Installation Space — New season schedule and project descriptions:

Jea Alford (Student PSU) March 24 – April 18, 2014
Artist and Portland State University MFA student Jea Alford opens the new season of installations with a quiet and thoughtful work built around a cascade of prayer flags that cross the space overhead. The plastic trash bags the flags are crafted from references the artist’s personal experience growing up in poverty, conscious of the phrase and connotations of being “white-trash.” The prayer flag form is a nod to her current experience, navigating the primarily upper-middleclass worlds of art and academia. From each of the individual prayer flags, rectangles the size of dollar bills have been removed, a ghostly reference to the equals or equality sign. The flags convey a personal prayer of the artist’s, and create a calm space for viewers to reflect on their own hopes and prayers. Jea Alford’s installation (below), shown here under construction in her studio, kicks-off a new season at the Portland Building.

pdxbLDG_Alford-1

Wendy Given April 28 – May 23, 2014
In Truth – Three interactive works occupy the space: a “true mirror” in the far corner; a sculpture of a wishing well mounted at a tall, unattainable height in the center of the space; a contemporary representation of a “scrying stone”
(akin to a crystal ball for fortune telling) formally framed on the wall. Guided by natural philosophy, history, folklore, myth and magic, Given seeks to conjure the notion of interconnectedness in the space and stimulate the viewer to explore their personal understanding of how they are seen in the world, what their aspirations are, and where they think they might be headed next.

Erica Thomas & Emily Fitzgerald (Student – PSU) June 2 – June 27, 2014
Redefining Family: A Portrait of Portland – Thomas & Fitzgerald transform the Installation Space into a photo studio to make professional, studio quality, portraits of employees who work in the Portland Building and their families. The artists will offer an invitation to all who work in the building to bring their families, however they choose to define family, to a portrait session. Participants will be encouraged to think beyond traditional definitions and deeply investigate what “family” means to them. This could include domestic partners, childcare providers, neighbors, close friends, ex-spouses, grandparents, godchildren or any other important relationships they might choose to identify—even choosing to be photographed as an individual is an option. Redefining Family seeks to promote interesting conversations and formalize bonds between the participants and their chosen families.

Jesse Taylor (Student – OCAC) July 7 – August 1, 2014
Deconstruction Reconstruction: Office – Taylor proposes to deconstruct the contents of a typical Portland Building office cubical and rebuild the pieces into a dynamically arranged abstract sculptural installation. Rather than a strict formalist exercise, he sees the project as a work of joy and finds that “deconstructing labor” is labor that contradicts the daily grind variety—something done with the same energy that would go into making, but without the need for purpose or production. The abstractions will be completely recognizable as elements of office furniture and fittings, but the recontextualizations and new juxtapositions infuse the bits and pieces with new perspective—one based on their real (and unappreciated) shape, form and texture.

Abigail McNamara August 11 – September 5, 2014
660 Strings – 660 strings hung in a line across the center of the Installation Space—they run from ceiling to floor. Each individual string represents one minute in the working day of the Portland Building. This shimmering visual statement, that will respond to air currents made by passers-by and refract light that strikes it, also has another purpose. The strings will be precisely plotted with knots and dye to create a graphic representation of the number of individuals that enter and exit the building, minute by minute, over the course of a day. McNamara sees her rippling screen as a way not just to get visitors to stop and consider the role they play in a set of daily migrations, but also as a way to comment on the organic patterns and forms that observation and a little math can manifest from our unconscious comings and goings. Abigail McNamara’s Circuits/paths installation (below) from 2013; McNamara and eight other artists will present new a new set of installations at the Portland Building over the next 12 months.

PDX_mcnamaraa_(300)

Yoonhee Choi September 15 – October 10, 2014
Stratascape – Artist Yoonhee Choi was intrigued by a comment made in the RACC information session about the Portland Building application process; specifically that there are literally hundreds of layers of paint on the gallery walls. Choi began to wonder what these layers might look like if someone could display a cross-section. As the idea developed, she considered how she might mine the archeological stratigraphy in a manner that would get visitors thinking, in deliberate terms, about all art installations that have taken place in the space since 1994—nine installations a year x 20 years. Choi will first mark her own installation by applying a fresh top-coat of gray paint, she will then cut into the walls to reveal the history concealed within the strata. By systematically excavating (with utility knives and carving tools) and formally presenting the unearthed layers in a museum case and a specially built display wall, she will create a wordless homage to all the artists before her who have labored at the site in the name of art.

Noah Greene November 10 – December 5, 2014
Parts of No Sum, or Trails Do Not End Only Infinitely Disperse –Like Wendy Given, Noah Greene proposes an installation of three elements in cryptic conversation. Here, the trio will consist of broken concrete stacked on the floor; a partial set of salvaged wooden steps mirroring the existing stairwell; and a painting composed of ash, wallpaper scrap, and other debris material. Responding to Michael Graves’ emphasis on symbolic structure in his design of the Portland Building, Greene attempts to invert this concept by investigating the symbolic life of decommissioned and dislocated design elements. By examining the passage of material from its function within a structure to its end state in landfill, Greene looks to highlight a new set of symbolic meanings for the visitor to consider as these trace remains of witnessed experience linger and hint at the object’s former self.

Jessica Hickey January 12 – February 6, 2015
Pliable Planes – Jessica Hickey sees parallels in textiles and architecture—both originated as a means to protect and insulate that which they enclose, both developed geometric and decorative designs for aesthetic and symbolic purposes (“fashion” and “style” are used to describe trends in both disciplines), both often rely on patterned grids and lines for their visual language. Capitalizing on this common ground, Hickey, a skilled textile designer and fabricator, will present a scaled-down, quilted version of the Portland Building that will cover the entire entryway of the Installation Space. Her soft façade will offer an alternate, more accessible, more “protecting and insulating” environment that will bring the form and style of our famous post-modern landmark to a scale all can see and explore up close.

Peg Butler February 17 – March 13, 2015
Control R – Through a project the artist describes as “both absurd and practical,” Butler intends to bring together multiple methods that have been shown by studies to make people feel happier and offer them as a quick restorative treatment to Portland Building visitors in the Installation Space. Building employees and visitors will be invited to unplug from their screens and duties, have a seat, and take a shortcut to boosted feelings of refreshment. They will have the opportunity to bask under full spectrum lighting, don headphones playing a soundscape of laughter, and connect with nature via a large forest view that fills the main wall. Butler sees the piece as an earnest attempt to provide Portland Building denizens with a quick mid-day energy lift and on another level, alludes to a culture with habits steeped in shortcuts and supplements.


Now available: RACC’s 2013 annual report

PORTLAND, OR — Today the Regional Arts & Culture Council (RACC) released its annual report for 2013. This year’s report, designed entirely as an online experience, is available at www.racc.org/2013annualreport. It includes highlights of RACC’s activities last year in service to artists and arts organizations in Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington Counties.
 
Among the organization’s accomplishments in 2013:
  • RACC advanced its equity and inclusion work by developing new funding opportunities for culturally-specific communities, and providing more equity resources for RACC-funded organizations.
  • RACC raised over $444,000 in earned income and nearly $700,000 in private sector contributions – including corporate donations, foundation grants, and workplace giving contributions.  
  • RACC maintained low management and general expenses, at 11.5%.
  • RACC awarded $3.3 million to artists, arts organizations and schools. Seventy-four citizen volunteers participated in the grant review process last year.
  • The Right Brain Initiative is now serving more than 14,000 students at 49 schools in six districts across the region.
  • RACC completed several large-scale public art projects last year, including Inversion: Plus/Minus and Streetcar Stop for Portland, as well as several smaller projects and four community murals.

RACC will present this report formally to Portland City Council at its annual “State of the Arts” presentation this spring, tentatively scheduled for the afternoon of Wednesday, April 23rd. For more information, contact Jeff Hawthorne at jhawthorne@racc.org; 503-823-5258.


Joseph Kucinski’s installation “The Tenacity of Change” opens at the Portland Building February 18

PORTLAND, ORE –  Joseph Kucinski’s upcoming installation at the Portland Building is aimed at capturing a moment of wonderment and curious expectation. To accomplish this he looks to his childhood for inspiration: “The world was alive and everything in it could be a new adventure, even the mundane garage had infinite possibilities.”
Kucinski’s exuberance is contagious as he employs the humble garage door as his jumping-off point for a discussion on the wonder the future can hold. The installation, which includes a full scale roll-up garage door built to fit the main wall, positions the viewer inside a mock garage to contemplate a flood of mysterious light leaking in from “outside,” light that beckons those with imagination to explore what lies beyond.
“Even as we lose our innocence with age and saddle growing responsibility, it is more important than ever to keep intact that sense of wonderment and open the door. Enter the light.”
About the Artist:  Born in Amherst, Massachusetts, Joseph Kucinski now calls Portland home.   He has shown his work nationally and internationally and in 2012 was featured in the Dublin Biennial.  Kucinski works in both two and three dimensions, but is best known for his large scale ink and oil paintings that often incorporate unexpected media such as sand, gold leaf and copper.  His work is featured in detail at www.josephkucinski.com where visitors will also find a short documentary about the artist by filmmaker Brandon Reed.
Viewing Hours & Location: The Portland Building is located at 1120 SW 5th Avenue in downtown Portland and is open 8 am to 5 pm, Monday – Friday. 
For more information on the Portland Building Installation Space series, including images, proposals and statements for all the installations since 1994, go to www.racc.org/installationspace.