RACC Blog

Regional Arts & Culture Council elects new board members and officers

The Regional Arts & Culture Council (RACC) board of directors has re-elected Lina Garcia Seabold as the Chair of the board for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2014, and Bonita Oswald, has been elected as Vice-Chair.

Lina Garcia Seabold is owner and partner of Seabold Construction Co., Inc.; Cornell Estates Living Center; Rosewood Park Retirement and Assisted Living Center; Rosewood Specialty Care; and Avamere at Bethany. She is also an active artist. Lina is past president of MANA de Portland, which provides education and advocacy to Latinas. Past professional experience includes working on the Eastside and Westside Light Rail Projects with Tri-Met as well as a stint in the Governor’s Office creating and developing the Office of Minority, Women and Emerging Small Business.

Bonita Oswald is a graphics designer for Washington County’s Department of Land Use & Transportation. Bonita has served as a board member of the Westside Cultural Alliance and continues to serve on RACC’s Executive Committee, Equity Task Force, and Grants Review Committee.

Joining Seabold and Oswald as officers on the RACC Board are treasurer Jennifer C. Cies, a marketing and product development professional whose prior experience in financial services includes several years as VP Director of Product Strategies with Umpqua Bank.; and secretary Alan Alexander III, the owner of Dub Squad Music, BMI, which produces and licenses original music compositions for film, video and the performing arts.

In addition, two new members have been elected to the RACC board:

  • Lew Frederick is currently a two-term Oregon State Representative representing House District 43 in North and Northeast Portland and focusing on public safety, education, and economic health. He is also currently a Strategic Communications Consultant, former member of the Oregon State Board of Education, former Board member for OMSI, Oregon Bus Project, Geneform, and Oregon Shakespeare Festival. He was a long-time reporter for KGW TV, Director of Public Information for Portland Public Schools, teacher, actor and ranch hand. We welcome this multi-talented individual.
  • Jodi Delahunt Hubbell has over 25 years of banking experience working in many different facets of the banking world. She has also done consulting with a highly regarded firm where she specialized in helping her domestic and international clients leverage their resources. She has been with The Commerce Bank of Oregon first as Chief Financial and Operations Officer and now as Chief Executive Officer. She brought her sound financial knowledge and experience to the Literary Arts Board, which she chaired, and to Oregon Ballet Theater. She volunteers with other non-profits as well, such as Dove Lewis and the American Heart Association. She recently was recognized as a 2013 Women of Influence Orchid Award Winner by the Portland Business Journal.
    Continuing RACC Board members for FY14 include: Jesse Beason, Nik Blosser, Verlea G. Briggs, Jay Clemens, Eileen L. Day, Daryl Dixon, Mike Golub, Kira Higgs, Phillip Hillaire, Eric R. Hormel, Karen Karbo, Joe Krumm, Max M. Miller, Jr., Joanna Priestley, Brian Rice and Jan Robertson. Board and staff profiles are available online at www.racc.org/about/staff-board.

Carol Smith Ed.D. and Peg Malloy have rotated off the RACC Board after serving eight and six years, respectively. RACC greatly appreciates their long and committed service to the organization and the arts community.
 


“Queering Portlandia,” by Anthony Hudson at the Portland Building 7/9-8/2

Project Background: Despite her notoriety and our love for her, Portlandia is irrefutably rooted in European sculptural tradition. The 35 foot high hammered copper statue that graces the façade of the Portland Building depicts the image of a classical female figure with European features. In that sense she represents only a portion our city’s diverse population. Artist and performer Anthony Hudson, who identifies as a “queer Portlander, a native Oregonian, and a Grand Ronde Indian,” will offer up a series of alternate Portlandias that embody the diversity that exists in Portland today. “Queering is essentially to make something queer, different, to make it anti-oppressive; queering here is to make Portlandia accessible again, giving an underprivileged audience a chance to recreatePortlandia in their own image.”

During set hours each week (noon to 2 pm Monday – Thursday, or by appointment via ahudson@pnca.edu), Hudson will transform the Installation Space into a photo booth/performance set complete with a selection of costumes and props. The project is open to anyone who wishes to take part, participants are invited to pose or perform on camera to create their own version of Portlandia. In the artist’s words “Queering Portlandia will allow for a multitude of new Portlandias: Portlandia as a person of color, Portlandia as queer, Portlandia as a person with disabilities, Portlandia as a true, living Portlander. Queering Portlandia will demonstrate our community’s commitment to providing visibility, safety and opportunity to all its citizens.”

About the Artist: Anthony Hudson is an Oregon native and received his BFA in Intermedia from Pacific Northwest College of Art in 2013. His work draws on mythology, theatre, popular culture, and critical theory; he has been featured in Hand2Mouth Theatre’s Risk/Reward Festival, Conduit Dance’s Dance+ Festival, and Performance Works NW’s Richard Foreman Mini-Festivals. Hudson is perhaps best known as Portland’s drag clown Carla Rossi, “an immortal trickster whose attempts at hegemonic realness almost always result in fantastic failure and revelations of her own mutability and vulnerability.”

About the Installation Space: Each year the Portland Building Installation Space series reserves several exhibition opportunities for advanced students in fine art. The format and presentation requirements for the student installations are identical to those for established professional artists, the Regional Arts & Culture Council created this separate eligibility category to help introduce emerging talents to the world of public art. Anthony Hudson is the 3rd student artist to present work this season.

Viewing Hours & Location: 8 am to 5 pm, Monday – Friday. The Portland Building is located at 1120 SW 5th Avenue in downtown Portland. Admission is always free. Queering Portlandia runs through August 2nd.

For more information on the Portland Building Installation Space series, including images, proposals and statements for all the installations since 1994, go to www.racc.org/installationspace.


Sallie Tisdale named RACC’s 2013 Literature Fellow

The Regional Arts & Culture Council (RACC) is pleased to announce its 2013 Literature Fellow: Sallie Tisdale. This fellowship honor carries a cash award of $20,000.

“Sallie Tisdale is a pillar of the writing community,” said Eloise Damrosch, executive director of RACC. “Her work is honest, authentic and clear, and she doesn’t waste a word. We are thrilled to recognize her as a master of her craft, and to honor her with this award.”

Tisdale has written everything from short memoirs to books, from personal poems to complex essays. She has already compiled a mature body of work which has appeared in the finest magazines in the country (The New Yorker, Harper’s, The New Republic, and Salon). She has published seven books, including Stepping Westward which was named to two best nonfiction book lists of the West. Her other books include Women of the Way, The Best Thing I Ever Tasted, and Talk Dirty to Me. She has received various awards including an NEA Fellowship in Belle Lettres, the James Phelan Award for Creative Fiction and a Pushcart Prize. She has taught or presented at New York University, Northwestern University, Omega Institute, University of California-Davis, and Antioch University. She has also taught writing at prisons, elementary schools and churches. In addition to her writing career, Tisdale has worked as a nurse and raised a family. More information can be found at her website sallietisdale.com.

Tisdale has been working for some time on a book about our reflex toward charity – what it means to do good, how one knows what good is, how many ways it can go wrong – in the context of a small clinic in Africa founded by Oregonians. She also has several essays in various stages of completion.

“RACC’s Fellowship will give me the gift of time to pursue this long and complicated work,” Tisdale says. Her goal is to write free of commercial or contractual demands over the next year. “The energy to write is powerful,” she says, “the curiosity to explore and get lost and find my way out again is as strong as it has ever been. What I need is time.”

The RACC Artists Fellowship Award, established in 1999, is one of the largest and most prestigious grants to individual artists in the Pacific Northwest, supporting exceptional artists who enrich the communities in our region. One fellowship is awarded each year, rotating through four artistic disciplines.

To be eligible for consideration, professional artists must have worked in their field for 10 years and have lived in the Portland tri-county area for five years. Applications, which include three narrative questions, artist resumes, two letters of recommendation, and examples of the artist’s work, are reviewed through a panel process of community representatives from the discipline being honored.

Dan DeWeese, Kathleen Holt, Karen Karbo, Flavia Rocha, and Elizabeth Woody served as panelists for the Literature Fellowship this year.

Tisdale joins a prestigious group of local artists who have been named RACC Fellows in the past, including Mary Oslund, Obo Addy, Christine Bourdette, Terry Toedtemeier, Jim Blashfield, Michele Glazer, Tomas Svoboda, Keith Scales, Judy Cooke, Michael Brophy, Chel White, Craig Lesley, Thara Memory, Henk Pander, Joanna Priestley, Kim Stafford, Robin Lane, Eric Stotik and Lawrence Johnson. All RACC fellows are listed at racc.org/grants/individual-artist-fellowships.
 
 


RACC seeks submissions for the “Visual Chronicle of Portland”

The Regional Arts & Culture Council (RACC) is seeking works on paper—prints, drawings, paintings on paper and photographs—to purchase for the Visual Chronicle of Portland collection. The budget for the purchase and framing of artwork is $10,000. The deadline for submissions is Monday, July 15, 2013

Background: The Visual Chronicle of Portland is a collection of original works on paper that portray artists’ perceptions of what makes the City of Portland unique. TheChronicle is owned by the City, and exists as a subset of its Public Art Collection. Since its beginning in 1985, theChronicle has grown to 303 works by 179 different artists and has established itself as an important archive of daily life in Portland, Oregon. RACC oversees the day-to-day management of the Visual Chronicle for the City and insures that the collection remains available to the public by rotating works throughout public spaces in City of Portland and Multnomah County buildings. The collection strives to reflect a diversity of populations, artistic disciplines and points of view.

Until I served on the Visual Chronicle Selection Panel I had no idea what a diverse and talented group of artists was at work in Portland. This collection is a testament to the fact that there is not just one Portland, but many—and that we need the artists’ perspectives to get a glimpse of those aspects of the city.
               – Former Visual Chronicle Selection panel member Judith Barrington 

Images and details of the entire collection can be seen by going to www.racc.org/visualchronicle 

Theme for 2013: As in the past, purchase selections will be made based on how well the work matches the purpose and spirit of the Visual Chronicle—conveying perceptions of what makes Portland unique. This year however, the selection panel would like to encourage work that documents, describes, or evokes areas, communities and issues that are under-represented in the Chronicle. The bridges, the Rose Parade, Washington Park and other Portland icons, are all well cataloged, but the collection has fewer works that represent people and places that exist beyond downtown and outside of the mainstream. While no absolute boundaries or subjects are mandated or excluded, the panel hopes to add range to the Chronicle and better represent vital neighborhoods, communities and artists that contribute to a fully textured view of Portland.

Selection and Purchase Process: Additions to the Chronicle are supported each year by a fund of $10,000 which covers the purchase of new artwork and archival matting and framing. The Chronicle is restricted to works on paper no larger than 24” x 30”; this keeps the cost of individual pieces modest and allows the selection panel to purchase multiple works.

The selection panel is composed of an independent group of artists and curators. This year’s panel includes Yoonhee Choi, artist and teacher; Gabe Flores, artist, curator; Roll Hardy, artist; Grant Hottle, artist, teacher; Blake Shell, artist, curator. The selection process will take place in two parts—an initial review of digital images followed by a final review of actual artwork.

Submission Details: Works on paper—prints, drawings, paintings on paper and photographs—from professional artists familiar with Portland are eligible. For more information and to download guidelines in English or Spanish, visit the RACC website at www.racc.org (direct link: http://www.racc.org/public-art/racc-opportunity-2013-call-visual-chronicle-portland), or contact program manager Keith Lachowicz at klachowicz@racc.org or 503-823-5404.

Information Session: To assist artists with the submission process and to provide additional
in-depth background on the Visual Chronicle collection RACC staff will hold an information session on Tuesday, June 25th from 5:30pm – 6:30pm at RACC offices, 411 NW Park Avenue, Suite 101.  Email Keith Lachowicz atklachowicz@racc.org to reserve a spot. RACC staff is also available to speak off-site to groups of artists who would like to learn more about this purchase opportunity.

Submission Deadline: The deadline for all submissions is Monday, July 15, 2013 at 5pm.

For more information contact project staff:
Keith Lachowicz
klachowicz@racc.org
503-823-5865

Interpretation services available, 503-823-5071
Servicio de interpretación disponible
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MEDIA ALERT: BCCTV to screen new works on June 10 at the Hollywood Theatre

WHO: BCCTV on the Big Screen

WHAT: A screening of short works created through a program at the Bud Clark Commons homeless service center

WHEN: Monday June 10th at 7p.m.

WHERE: Hollywood Theatre, 4122 NE Sandy Boulevard

NOTES: This screening is a culmination of the diverse works produced over the past year at a RACC-sponsored, artist led production lab at Bud Clark Commons (BCC, at NW Irving & Broadway in Old Town/Chinatown). They range from personal documentary to live action horror, from comedic sketches to fictional dramas and a variety of animated shorts. The videos were conceived and produced by David Boston, Sumaiyya Evans, Eugene Olson, John Pinney, Russell Waggener. The project was organized and led by local artists, designers, and filmmakers, Carl Diehl, Ariana Jacob, Joan Lundell, Mack McFarland and Jeffrey Richardson who will also screen a selection of their works at the event.

Partially funded by a portion of the City of Portland Percent for Art set aside from the construction of Bud Clark Commons, the project is part of RACC’s intersections program, which encourages artists in all disciplines to explore new working methods and to develop socially engaging, interactive art experiences in community settings. Admission is free.


RACC seeks proposals for artistic projects in 2014

The Regional Arts & Culture Council (RACC) invites nonprofit organizations and individual artists in Multnomah, Washington and Clackamas Counties to submit proposals for artistic projects and cultural events planned for calendar year 2014. “Intent to Apply” forms must be submitted online – http://racc.org/GrantsOnline – by 5:00 p.m. on August 7, 2013. 

RACC Project Grants support a wide range of artistic activities throughout the Portland tri-county region. To be eligible, projects must involve the creation or presentation of a performance, exhibit, or other work of art that is available to the general public. Proposals must address one of the following objectives:

  • Artistic Focus: These projects will demonstrate high artistic quality, innovation, creativity in programming and excellence in artist selection.
  • Community Participation: These projects support cultural and artistic programs with high levels of community participation. Projects in this category should impact participants by providing them with a greater sense of self, family, community and place through learning and participating in their own artmaking experience.
    A third category of Project Grants are specifically for artists working in schools. “Arts-in-Schools” applications and guidelines will be available after August 28th with deadlines in October.

Approximately $585,000 is available for projects in 2014, with awards ranging from $1,000 to $6,000 each. RACC encourages submissions from new, emerging, and established artists alike. All eligible proposals will be grouped by discipline and adjudicated by a panel of community volunteers with interest and experience in arts and culture programming. 

Guidelines and other important materials – including a list of projects that were funded in 2013– are available online at www.racc.org/grants. All applications must be submitted using RACC’s online grants system atwww.racc.org/GrantsOnline; RACC provides computer access and technical support for people who require assistance.

RACC staff are available to guide applicants through the process of submitting a competitive application. First-time applicants should contact Helen Daltoso at 503-823-5402 or hdaltoso@racc.org for assistance. Returning applicants should contact Ingrid Carlson at 503-823-5417 or icarlson@racc.org. RACC also provides over-the-phone interpretation services for people with limited English proficiency; call 503-823-5071.

In addition to providing one-on-one support and online video tutorials (available at http://www.youtube.com/RegionalArts), RACC provides free orientation sessions to help applicants better understand RACC Project Grant guidelines and application procedures.

Orientations for individual artists will be held on Thursday, June 20th from 2:00 to 4:00pm (PASSED); Thursday, July 18th from 3:00 to 5:00pm (PASSED);  Monday, July 29th from 2:00 to 4:00pm. (PASSED)
Orientations for not-for-profit organizations will be held on Tuesday, July 16th from 2:00 to 4:00pm (PASSED) and Wednesday, July 24th from 2:00 to 4:00pm. (PASSED)

All orientations will be held at the RACC offices, 411 NW Park Avenue, Suite 101. RACC staff will notify applicants via email as to whether their “Intent to Apply” proposal meets the intention of the Project Grant. Final proposals must be submitted electronically through the online system by August 21, 2013 at 5:00pm, and uploaded supplemental materials and physical application copies received at the RACC offices no later than August 28, 2013 at 5:00pm. Awards will be announced in mid-December.


Media production lab BCCTV will screen new works on June 10 at the Hollywood Theatre

On Monday, June 10th at 7:00PM, BCCTV will host a free screening of short works created by individuals who have experienced homelessness. The films were made at a RACC-sponsored, artist led production lab at Bud Clark Commons (BCC, at NW Irving & Broadway in Old Town/Chinatown) and will be screened at Hollywood Theatre (4122 NE Sandy Blvd.) Admission is free.

“BCCTV on the Big Screen” will showcase a culmination of a year’s worth of works ranging from personal documentary to live action horror, from comedic sketches to fictional dramas as well as a variety of animated shorts. Videos were conceived and produced by David Boston, Sumaiyya Evans, Eugene Olson, John Pinney, Russell Waggener. The project was organized and lead by local artists, designers, and filmmakers, Carl Diehl, Ariana Jacob, Joan Lundell, Mack McFarland and Jeffrey Richardson who will also screen a selection of their works at the event.

In a series of workshops and weekly meetings over the last twelve months, a community of video makers was formed at the Commons, calling themselves BCCTV. Free weekly classes and workshops were offered to anyone who had experienced homelessness, focusing on how to make, edit and share videos. Participants explored their own interests in video with the support and expertise of the artist team as well as visiting artists from the community. They learned improvisation, animation techniques, visual storytelling, sound design and editing which in turn made them eager to delve further into longer-term, more personal projects, all of which will be seen at this screening event.

About Bud Clark Commons
Bud Clark Commons is an innovative partnership between the Portland Housing Bureau, Home Forward, Transition Projects Inc, and Multnomah County, that is owned and managed by Home Forward. The building was designed by Holst Architecture and opened in June 2011. The Commons brings together services and providers in one location, providing vital resources, shelter, and housing placement services to people experiencing homelessness in Portland.

Before the award-winning building was even constructed, the two primary programs that provide services in the building – Transition Projects Inc. (TPI) and Home Forward – were interested in having artists work in the facility and engage the clients and residents in creative, experiential and participatory ways. In early 2012, the BCCTV artist team was selected through an open call to artists living in Multnomah County. Partially funded by a portion of the City of Portland Percent for Art set aside from the construction of the building, the project is part of RACC’s intersections program, established in 2000, which encourages artists in all disciplines to explore new working methods and to develop socially engaging, interactive art experiences in community settings.

For interviews, contact BCCTV at thebcctv@gmail.com.
 
 


“Welcome” opens at the Portland Building Installation Space June 3rd

Project Background: Artists Patricia Vazquez Gomez and Betty Marin will present their social practice based Welcomeinstallation in the lobby of the Portland Building June 3 – 28. The project was conceived when the artists began to contemplate the connection between the building that institutionally represents the City of Portland and the lives and experiences of some of the city’s newest residents. Grounded in this artist team’s work with Latin American immigrant communities, and in their own cultural roots, the project directly explores the ways in which Spanish speaking immigrants feel both welcome and not welcome here in Portland. The installation consists of projected images of new Portland residents interviewed by the artists presented against a “wallpaper” backdrop crafted from the text of those conversations. As a parting symbol of civic exchange, a small artesanal souvenir—a set of open hands crafted from tin that multiple cultures recognize as a symbol of hospitality—will be offered to visitors to take away.

“Our hope for this project is to initiate a reflection on the way Portland is already a welcoming city and the ways it still needs to grow as an inclusive place.”

As general understanding of the social practice genre develops and expands MFA programs like the one at Portland State University, that Vazquez Gomez and Marin are enrolled in, are on the forefront of defining where this form of art practice is headed. RACC is pleased to include Welcome as part of its ongoing initiative to provide exhibition opportunities for advanced students in fine art, this is the second of three student produced installations scheduled for the Portland Building this year. The format and presentation requirements for student installations are identical to those for established professional artists, the separate eligibility category was created to help introduce emerging talents to the world of public art.

Viewing Hours & Location: 7 am to 6 pm, Monday – Friday. The Portland Building is located at 1120 SW 5th Avenue in downtown Portland.

For more information on the Portland Building Installation Space series, including images, proposals and statements for all the installations since 1994, go to www.racc.org/installationspace.

On Friday June 14th, 5-6pm: Meet the artists who created Welcome at the Portland Building Installation Space. Social Practice artists Patricia Vazquez Gomez and Betty Marin will hold an artist Q & A session to discuss their Welcome installation in the lobby of the Portland Building. Welcome was created to inform and expand the connection between the building that represents the City of Portland and the experiences of some of the city’s newer residents. Grounded in this artist team’s social-practice work in the immigrant community, and in their own cultural roots, the project explores the ways in which Spanish speaking immigrants feel both welcome and not welcome here in Portland. The Q & A will take place at the Portland Building, located at 1120 SW 5th Avenue, Portland. 
 


RACC celebrates new mural on N. Albina & Mississippi

Detail from SpaceCraft's new mural.

Detail from SpaceCraft’s new mural.

The artist collective, SpaceCraft Mission to Arts, has completed one of the largest murals funded by RACC’s Public Art Mural Program and will celebrate this collaborative project with a community celebration on Friday, May 24th, 3:30-6:30pm, in the grassy field across the street southwest of the project site. The mural is located on the west wall of the City of Portland’s Bureau of Transportation Maintenance facility (3150 N. Mississippi).

Planning for the mural began in Fall 2010, when the Northeast Coalition of Neighborhoods received a Graffiti Abatement Grant from the City of Portland to paint murals on buildings as a way to discourage graffiti. With that small grant and coordination with a team of artists from SpaceCraft, community members, and organizations began to raise funds for the project. Throughout the process, community engagement was the driving force—the Boise Neighborhood Association, students from the former Albina Youth Opportunity School, former Humboldt Elementary, Boise Elliot Middle School, community members, and the PBOT maintenance workers all contributed their voices to the mural design and how they wanted themselves and their neighborhood depicted. More than a way to deter graffiti, the artists see the mural as a powerful, onhealthy collaborative, self-reflective vision of the neighborhood created by those who live in it.

Painting began during the Summer 2012 and was led by SpaceCraft artists, Jakub Kucharczyk, Matthew Wooldridge and Max Humphres. The mural unfolds across 177 ft and features images related to community practices and industries that have been part of the local Portland-Albina neighborhood over the last several eras. Native American landscape migrates into historic industries of lumber, railroad and steel which subsequently move into representations of the diversity of people and activities characteristic of Portland. Featured throughout the mural are mountains, bridges, gardens, parks, and city workers. Included are symbols of the neighborhoods’ transitions of communities from Native American, Volga Germans, Finnish, Chinese and African American.

Travelers on N. Mississippi Ave between N. Fremont St. and N. Monroe St. will see the mural by car, foot, and bike. It is also visible to Northbound drivers on I-5 and I-405. The mural will serve as a gateway to the Historic Mississippi Business District and Boise neighborhood and discourage graffiti

This project was funded in part by a Portland Graffiti Abatement grant and the RACC Public Art Murals Program.

To interview the artists, contact Peggy Kendellen at 503-823-4196 or pkendellen@racc.org.


Photos by Jonathan Marrs installed at Fire Station 18

Local photographer Jonathan Marrs recently installed a series of photographs printed on aluminum at Fire Station 18, 8720 SW 30th Avenue in Portland.   A celebration of the project’s completion, with the artist and station crew, will take place on Tuesday, May 21st, from 6:30-8:00pm. The celebration is open to the public.

Jonathan spent time with the FS 18 crew observing their day-to-day activities. His photographs describe the actions and textures that are part of those activities as well as the Station. Four diptychs and two single photographs grace the station’s entryway, the community room, the day room and hallway—all accessible to the public when visiting the station. The diptychs establish a relationship between the disparate events and the overlooked details that describe what Jonathan experienced and saw while spending time with the crews.

Jonathan Marrs is a visual artist based in Portland. He received his BA from Azusa Pacific University and his MFA from Vermont College of Fine Arts. His research has focused on documentary practices, identity, and subjectivity. His work has been displayed in the US from Portland to Los Angeles, Lancaster, and Montpelier. He is the lead photographer and cinematographer for Atelier Pictures in Portland.

Fire Station 18 serves Marshall Park, Markham, Far Southwest, West Portland Park, Multnomah, Ash Creek, Crestwood and Maplewood Neighborhood Associations. The original Fire Station 18 was built in 1961, and seismically upgraded/remodeled in 2011-2012. On-duty personnel include a company officer, one firefighter paramedic and two firefighters.

This is the final percent for art project funded by the bond measure passed by voters in 2000 that resulted in new and remodeled fire stations that improved services and safety to the community. The Regional Arts & Culture Council managed the project.
 
 


Installation of Dan Corson’s “Nepenthes” now underway

PA Corson NW 5th-NW Davis SWArtist Dan Corson and RACC are currently installing Nepenthes, a series of four illuminated sculptures along NW Davis Street. These glowing sculptural elements are inspired by the carnivorous plants called Nepenthes, which are named after the magical Greek potion that eliminates sorrow and suffering. By referencing the patterns of native Oregon native and other carnivorous plants and inserting a quirky expression of nature into an urban environment, these sculptures celebrate Old Town Chinatown neighborhood’s unique and diverse community.

This project represents the fulfillment of an opportunity that developed during the Portland Mall Project to increase pedestrian connectivity between Old Town/China Town Festival Streets and the Pearl District. In conjunction with Old Town/Chinatown stakeholders, the Mall design team created a pathway along NW Davis Street, via a sculptural lighting design, which links the music and cultural activities of Old Town/Chinatown to the activities in the Pearl District, also along Davis Street, such as galleries, the Museum of Contemporary Craft and Portland Center Stage, and vice versa.

The Portland Mall design team, lead by ZGF, hired artist Dan Corson to create a series of sculptural lighting elements. TriMet ultimately asked the Regional Arts & Culture Council to take over the project on behalf of the City of Portland public art collection. RACC then put together a panel that included some of the original stakeholders as well as other artists and neighbors to work with Corson on the refinement of his sculptures. RACC worked with Portland Transportation on the exact placement of the sculptures.

To arrange a site visit and/or interview with the artists, contact Kristin Calhoun at 503-823-5111 or kcalhoun@racc.org.


Installation of Jorge Pardo’s Streetcar Art Shelter now underway

RACC and artist Jorge Pardo have begun installing a new Streetcar Art Shelter at NE Broadway and Weidler. This eccentrically shaped sculpture will provide a shelter with “rainy on the outside, sunny on the inside” experience for waiting streetcar passengers.

Fabricated of steel, wood and fiberglass, the new shelter measures 35’ long by 18’ wide by 16’ tall. The multi-faceted structure will include over 300 individual panels in shades of gray and brown on the exterior, with warm hues of orange and yellow on the inside, sheltering passengers north of the Rose Quarter in a highly visible and fantastically colorful way.

Los Angeles based Pardo was the recipient of a 2010 MacArthur Foundation Fellowship who exhibits his work globally. This is his first municipal project in the United States. It is funded by the percent-for-art set-aside for the Portland Streetcar expansion project, and will take about a month to fully install.

The shelter is a complement to the other large scale project commissioned for the Portland Streetcar expansion, Lead Pencil Studio’s Inversion: Plus Minus which will be located at Grand & Hawthorne and Grand & Belmont. The installation of Inversion: Plus Minus is now over half complete, with completion expected this summer.
 
 


The Right Brain Initiative receives renewed support from the National Endowment for the Arts

The Right Brain Initiative, a Portland area arts education partnership, has been awarded a $25,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). This program of the Regional Arts &Culture Council was selected from a pool of 1,547 eligible applications. The renewed support follows Right Brain’s first NEA award in 2011.

The Right Brain Initiative coaches K-8 schools to integrate the arts into every aspect of the student experience. The Initiative receives this NEA funding to support classroom programming that combines the arts with other subjects, and hands-on professional development for school staff and community-based teaching artists. In the 2013-14 school year, Right Brain will provide 24 full-day trainings for over 350 educators and classroom experiences for more than 15,000 children.

Art Works grants support the creation of art that meets the highest standards of excellence, public engagement with diverse and excellent art, lifelong learning in the arts, and the strengthening of communities through the arts. The 817 recommended NEA grants total $26.3 million and span 13 artistic disciplines and fields. Applications were reviewed by panels of outside experts convened by NEA staff and each project was judged on its artistic excellence and artistic merit. For a complete listing of projects recommended for Art Works grant support, please visit the NEA website at arts.gov.

This federal support leverages current local public and private funding. In the 2013 fiscal year, nearly half of The Right Brain Initiative’s funding (48%) comes from private sources, including corporations, private foundations and individuals. The remainder of the $847,000 budget comes from public sources, with support from the City of Portland, Clackamas County, Multnomah County, the Oregon Arts Commission and six partner school districts.

The Right Brain Initiative is a sustainable partnership of public schools, local government, foundations, businesses and the cultural community, which launched its programming in Portland area classrooms in January 2009. The program’s vision is to transform learning for all children through the arts, creativity, innovation and whole-brain thinking. The Right Brain Initiative is a project of the Regional Arts & Culture Council, with Young Audiences of Oregon & SW Washington serving as Implementation Partner. Read more atTheRightBrainInitiative.org.

The Regional Arts & Culture Council is the local arts agency for Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington Counties, providing grants for artists, schools and nonprofit organizations; conducting workplace giving for arts and culture (“Work for Art”) and other advocacy efforts; presenting workshops and other forms of technical assistance; providing printed and web-based resources for artists; and integrating art into public spaces. Online atracc.org.

The National Endowment for the Arts was established in Congress in 1965 an independent agency of the federal government. To date, the NEA has awarded more than $4 billion to support artistic excellence, creativity, and innovation for the benefit of individuals and communities. The NEA extends its work through partnerships with state arts agencies, local leaders, other federal agencies, and the philanthropic sector. To join the discussion on how art works, visit the NEA at arts.gov.


Jacob Sorenson’s “A Landscape” installation at the Portland Building runs from April 29 – May 24th

Project Background: “Is Bigfoot real? I hope so, but I’m pessimistic.” This quote from Jacob Sorenson might serve as a tagline for his installation which opens April 29th at the Portland Building Installation Space. Sorenson, known for his elaborately designed and elegantly constructed kinetic sculptures, will present a nature-circus landscape in the space that embodies the human tendency to ideologically and physically manipulate the environment. To the right a silhouette-like sculpture of a majestic tree-line, but augmented with Las Vegas style chase lights to better define the trees. To the left a device designed to reproduce the beautiful sunset we all hope for at the end of a day…only with a few extra colors and a repeat cycle. And finally, in the back, obscured by the tree-line, look for the occasional appearance of a certain large creature rumored to frequent in the area.

“The void between nature and culture is hazy…what is nature? And more perplexing, what is wilderness? Ideas conjured by our society in the 19th century, or concepts that came about as we found comfort, central heating and cars? Life is created in laboratories, engineers control landscapes, and “wild” space is parceled into quadrants. Cueing into our nature cliché I’ve found that certain tendencies persist, foremost a culture that is trying desperately to make nature look awesome, and I’d like to do the same. How much better would the tree-line be if it glowed? What if we could add new colors to an amazing sunset/sunrise? And what if Bigfoot made regular appearances? It would be…terrible, but let’s investigate.”

The artist fully expects the installation to ask more questions than it answers as it explores both the objection to artificial nature and the reality of our constant wilderness intervention. Sorenson’s bizarre landscape draws on an impulse buried somewhere in the depths of humanity and begins a complex, thoughtful conversation about an outdated ideology.

About the Artist: Jacob Sorenson lives in Tigard, Oregon. He received his BFA from Oregon College of Art and Craft, and his MFA from Virginia Commonwealth University. In addition to numerous exhibitions in Oregon and Virginia, he teaches classes on woodworking and electro-mechanical devices at OCAC.

Viewing Hours & Location: 7 am to 6 pm, Monday – Friday. The Portland Building is located at 1120 SW 5th Avenue in downtown Portland.

For more information on the Portland Building Installation Space series, including images, proposals and statements for all the installations since 1994, go to www.racc.org/installationspace.
 


Nichols Norman’s “Waiting Room” kicks off a new season of installations at the Portland Building

The Regional Arts & Culture Council (RACC) is pleased to announce a line-up of nine new installations by local artists at the Portland Building Installation Space. Over the next twelve months artists representing a wide range of approaches to art making will be featured in 4 week installments. Since 1994 RACC has managed the Installation Space in the Portland Building (located downtown at 1120 SW 5th Avenue) and has presented some of Portland’s best interactive and experimental media installations. At 13’wide by 8′ deep, this modestly sized venue is devoted exclusively to installation art. The space has developed a devout following over the years and competition for a spot on the roster is always spirited.

This year, 71 artists submitted proposals in the Professional Artist category, and 26 artists applied in the Student category. An independent selection panel reviewed all of the proposals, and ultimately selected nine site-specific works that are challenging, topical and diverse.

Portland Building Installation Space—2013/2014 Season Calendar and Project Descriptions:

Nicholas Norman, March 25 – April 19, 2013
Jacob Sorenson, April 29 – May 24, 2013
Patricia Vazquez Gomez & Betty Marin, June 3 – June 28, 2013
Anthony Hudson, July 8 – Aug 2, 2013
Michael Sell, August 12 – September 6, 2013
Paula Rebsom & Grant Hottle, September 16 – October 11, 2013
Ariana Jacob, October 21 – November 15, 2013
Paul Clay and Zachary Krausnick, January 13– February 7, 2014
Joseph Kucinski, February 17 – March 14, 2014

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Nicholas Norman (Student – PSU) March 25 – April 19, 2013
Waiting Room – Nicholas Norman’s work, which explores the meanings of places and how we understand them, kicks off the new season of installations at the Portland Building. Nicholas has a particular interest in waiting rooms: “Most of us are familiar with the experience of a waiting room, the uncomfortable seats, the horrible magazines, we know what it is…but what is the difference between a waiting room in an everyday doctor’s office versus a gallery?” Norman will create an artificial waiting room in the Installation Space to explore the difference between a fabrication and a room that is intentionally functional—is a fabricated space really any different if it can serve an identical purpose? Can a waiting room be anything other than a waiting room, or is its true meaning trapped within intention? Norman’s faux waiting room promises uncomfortable seating, dull magazines, a ticking clock, a potted plant, bad (but free) coffee, mediocre landscape paintings and the ubiquitous lost toy underneath the chair. Viewers are encouraged to bring their own interpretation to the installation, in this case however, they will be completely in control of the amount of time they decide to wait.

Jacob Sorenson April 29 – May 24, 2013
A Landscape – “Is Bigfoot real? I hope so. But I’m pessimistic.” This quote from Jacob Sorenson’s proposal might serve as a tagline for his installation. He’ll construct a nature-circus landscape in the space that embodies the human tendency to both ideologically and physically manipulate the environment. To the right picture a silhouette-like sculpture of a majestic tree-line, but with Las Vegas style chase-lights there to help better define the trees. To the left notice a sculpture that sets out to improve upon the beautiful sunset image we all hope for at the end of a day…only maybe with a few extra colors and a repeat cycle so we can enjoy it longer. And finally in the back, slightly obscured by the tree-line, look for that elusive silhouette of Bigfoot rumored to make periodic appearances.

Patricia Vazquez Gomez & Betty Marin (Students – PSU) June 3 – June 28, 2013
Welcome – Welcome is intended to inform and expand the connection between a building that represents the City of Portland and the experiences of some of this city’s newer residents. Grounded in this artist team’s social-practice work serving the immigrant community, and in their own cultural roots, the project will explore the ways in which Spanish speaking immigrants feel both welcome and not welcome in Portland. The physical installation will consist of projected images of those interviewed by the team, and text from participants’ responses presented as a “wallpaper” backdrop. In honor of the exchange of hospitality, a small artesanal souvenir will be offered to visitors to take home.

Anthony Hudson (Student – PNCA) July 8 – Aug 2, 2013
Queering Portlandia – Despite her notoriety and our love for her, Portlandia is irrefutably rooted, by sculptural tradition and in concept, to Euro-centrism. The 35 foot high hammered copper statue that graces the façade of the Portland Building depicts the image of a classical female figure with European features. In that sense she represents only a portion our city’s diverse population. Artist and performer Anthony Hudson, who identifies as a “queer Portlander, a native Oregonian, and a Grand Ronde Indian,” will offer up a series of alternate Portlandias that embody the diversity that exists in Portland today. “Queering is essentially to make something queer, different, to make it anti-oppressive; queering here is to make Portlandia accessible again, giving an underprivileged audience a chance to recreate Portlandia in their own image.” The Installation Space will be transformed into a richly decorated photo booth/performance set complete with a selection of costumes and props and participants will be invited to perform on camera as their own version of Portlandia. In the artist’s words “Queering Portlandia will allow for a multitude of new Portlandias: Portlandia as a person of color, Portlandia as queer, Portlandia as a person with disabilities, Portlandia as a true, living Portlander. Queering Portlandia will demonstrate our community’s commitment to providing visibility, safety and opportunity to all its citizens.”

Michael Sell August 12 – September 6, 2013
Untitled (Photoswatch installation) – Photographer Michael Sell’s installation explores the point at which fine art intersects with décor, and investigates how the one supports and/or subverts the other. Sell will turn the Installation Space into a floor-to-ceiling grid of color, with the individual colors to be sourced from actual artwork hung inside the Portland Building. The project will function as a site-specific extension of his Photoswatch series that sampled and presented a single rectangular swatch of color from famous photographs—thus collapsing all visual elements and meaning within the photograph into one single color statement. The painted panels on the grid in the Installation Space will reference individual works of art that are hung throughout the building and each grid will be labeled with the title and location of the source work (for example: Purple Fields, 9th Floor). On the floor of the space Sell will place rows of small “sample sized” cans of paint—all mixed to match the grid colors. These will be offered to visitors to take home as souvenirs so they can ponder how much meaning travels home with them.

Paula Rebsom & Grant Hottle September 16 – October 11, 2013
Forecast – This site-specific project marks the first in a series of collaborations between Rebsom and Hottle. It combines painted and sculptural elements to suggest an impossible but thought provoking NW scene. Upon entering the building lobby the viewer will encounter a painted landscape on a stretched canvas that completely covers the front of the installation space. The scene, a typical Pacific Northwest landscape will physically screen off the entry to the space and will appear as a purpose-built covering…with the exception of an odd protrusion in the center of the painting that stretches the canvas (without puncturing it) and pokes out slightly into the lobby, creating an immediate desire to see what lies behind. As the viewer proceeds to the stairs (which offer a view behind the painting) they discover the cause of the protrusion that intrudes on the landscape and ultimately exposes its façade-like quality. The installation cleverly goads us into reconsidering our reflex definitions of “wild” or “natural” and suggests we consider those terms through a more complex lens.

Ariana Jacob October 21 – November 15, 2013
Working Title: As You Make Your Bed, So You Must Lie in It? – Social Practice artist Ariana Jacob has proposed an “artist-in-residence” installation designed to create an intimate, yet public setting where people will discuss thoughts and feelings about being both a single individual citizen as well as an element of the collective entity that is the United States. The space will be set up as a bedroom (an intimate space everyone is familiar with) with the U.S. Constitution printed on the bed spread. The Articles and Amendments to the Constitution will be screen printed on the pillowcases, the walls of the space will be transformed into chalk-boards on which different sections of the Constitution will be written. As the installation progresses the chalkboard text will be collaboratively edited as agreed upon by artist and participants. Jacob, a veteran of several successful conversation-based projects, will keep regularly scheduled hours and will focus the sessions on gaining a better sense of “American identity” by addressing the document that legally and symbolically binds us together as a people.

Paul Clay and Zachary Krausnick January 13– February 7, 2014
Leda and the Swan – This team of I.T. savvy artists will present a fully interactive video interpretation of the classic “Leda and the Swan” story. In the darkened space a real-time digital projection will produce an image on the back wall of the installation space that is responsive to, and directed by, visitors’ body movements. As participants walk up to the opening of the space a projection of a swan will appear on the wall before them—the movements of the swan will mirror the movements of the participant as the viewer widens his/her arms, feathered wings will spread on the projected image, the swan’s feet will step and its neck will crane to match how the viewer orients his/her body. Ultimately the viewer will discover that faster, more violent movements will cause the feathers to fall off to reveal the figure of a woman (Leda). If the participant then returns to slower movements Leda will once again grow new feathers and transform back into the swan. The cycle continues on as long as there are participants willing to move.

Joseph Kucinski February 17 – March 14, 2014
The Tenacity of Change – Kucinski’s project is aimed at capturing a moment of wonderment and curious expectation. The installation will be composed of a custom garage door fit precisely into the space. With the viewer positioned “inside” the garage looking towards the outside, the door itself will be set so that the bottom edge hovers approximately two feet above the floor. A flood of mysterious colored light from under the door illuminates the darkened “garage” space. The piece is designed to create a sense of expectation and wonder as the viewer ponders what might lie ahead in the future if we are bold enough to (figuratively) open the door of the garage and move into the larger world, to look beyond the trepidation the future carries with it and think of it as an opportunity with infinite possibilities
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Viewing Hours & Location: 7 am to 6 pm, Monday – Friday. The Portland Building is located at 1120 SW 5th Avenue in downtown Portland. 

For more information on the Portland Building Installation Space series including images, proposals and statements for all the installations since 1994, go to www.racc.org/installationspace.


Todays the day! “Feed the Arts” at all Burgerville locations

On Thursday, March 21, Burgerville and Work for Art will host their third annual “Feed the Arts” community partnership day. Burgerville will donate a portion of all sales that day—up to $15,000—to Work for Art, a workplace campaign fund that supports arts and culture programs and services throughout the Northwest region. 

Burgerville puts a strong emphasis on fostering healthy, thriving communities, and one of their favorite ways of doing so is by supporting the arts in a variety of ways, including Feed the Arts day.

Jeff Harvey, president and CEO of Burgerville, describes it like this: “Like food, the arts are where we come together most powerfully to blend cultures, express ideas, balance opposing thoughts, and create healthy, lively communities,” he said. “The arts are not just how we survive—they’re how we thrive.”

Burgerville encourages its employees to participate in the arts throughout the year. Harvey finds their exposure to and involvement with the arts results in more productivity and innovation. Burgerville also gives its employees a chance to give back through the company’s annual Work for Art employee giving campaign. Last year, Burgerville employees directly contributed more than $25,000, in addition to the Feed the Arts proceeds.

For a list of Burgerville locations, all 39 of which are participating in Feed the Arts, visithttp://www.burgerville.com/find-a-restaurant.

About Work for Art
Donations to Work for Art’s Community Fund and Arts Education Fund support more than 100 vital arts and culture organizations every year – encompassing dance, visual arts, music, literary arts, media arts, theater, cultural arts, and arts education. 100% of all donations to Work for Art are passed through to these organizations – no administrative fees are deducted – and gifts from employees and other individuals are matched dollar-for-dollar by a Matching Challenge Fund. Anyone can donate to Work for Art online at workforart.org, and those who give $60 or more will be thanked with an Arts Card, which provides 2-for-1 tickets at hundreds of arts and culture events for a full year.

About Burgerville
Established in 1961, Burgerville is an innovative and industry-leading restaurant company with 39 locations throughout Oregon and Southwest Washington. 1,500 employees strong, Burgerville provides guests fresh, great-tasting food all day every day from breakfast to late-night snacks based in its mission “serve with love.” At Burgerville, the commitment to fresh, local and sustainable values is about helping people and communities thrive. For more, please visit burgerville.com.


Artists Garrick Imatani and Kaia Sand selected for the inaugural City of Portland Archives & Record Center Artist in Residence program

This is the first in a series of residencies for the Portland Archives & Record Center (PARC). The artists will create work that engages and/or is a result of working with the collections and staff at PARC. City Archivist Diana Banning says “We hope that this artist residency will help to breakdown stereotypes of how people use the historical collections. Seeing how artists interpret materials will bring a new perspective.” Within the next couple months, Imatani and Sand will work with PARC staff to develop a specific outline of what they intend to accomplish during their residency within the $25,000. The outcome will include public presentation(s) of the project through temporary installation/s, screening/s, exhibition/s or performance/s at PARC or other public locations. As the project develops, there will be additional media advisories.

This residency is funded by the City of Portland Percent for Art requirement from the building of the PARC within the Portland State University Academic & Student Recreation Center (ASRC). The Archive Artist Residency panel, made up of artists, representative of PARC and community members, selected Imatani and Sand through an open call process. A portion of the Percent for Art funds for PARC was used during the building of the facility to commission artist Keiko Hara to create glass artworks for the Research Room.

About the Artists:
Garrick Imatani researches the performative role of public monuments, the documented vs. undocumented, social rituals and civic duty. His work takes many forms from graphite documents, cyanotypes and video to sculpture, installations and collaborative public events. He has received multiple awards, including grants from the Oregon Arts Commission, Maine Arts Commission and Ford Family Foundation. He teaches interdisciplinary courses at Lewis & Clark College where he is Assistant Professor of Art and Studio Head of Foundations.

Kaia Sand is the author of two poetry collections, Remember to Wave (Tinfish Books 2010) and interval (Edge Books 2004), a Small Press Traffic book of the year. Her poetry is investigative and documentary, frequently incorporating research. She also moves poetry outside the book and into other contexts such as art spaces, walks, and a magic show, and co-authored a book on that subject, Landscapes of Dissent: Guerrilla Poetry and Public Space (Palm Press 2008). She teaches humanities in the Portland State University Honors Program and ecopoetry at Pacific University. She is the past recipient of two RACC project grants.
 
 


Now available: RACC’s annual report for 2012

The Regional Arts & Culture Council (RACC) has released its annual report for 2012. The year in review, available online at, www.racc.org/2012annualreport includes highlights of last year’s activities in service to artists and arts organizations in Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington Counties.

Among the organization’s accomplishments in 2012:

RACC expanded the public art collection through murals, portable works purchases, large-scale projects, and more
The Right Brain Initiative expanded its arts integration services to 44 schools
Work for Art, a workplace giving program for the arts, raised a record sum: $823,693
More artists and arts organizations received grants than ever before
Voters approved a new $35 income tax to support arts education and access in Portland
Electronic copies (HTML or PDF) can be accessed at www.racc.org/2012annualreport. Hardcopies are also available upon request; contact RACC at 503-823-5111 or mbauer@racc.org.
 
 


4/3 is the Intent to Apply Deadline for the Literature Fellowship

The Regional Arts & Culture Council (RACC) is now accepting applications from literary artists working in poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and playwriting for RACC’s annual artist fellowship award. Applications are now available online atracc.org/grantsonline.

Since 1999, the RACC fellowship award has honored and supported uniquely talented local artists who contribute to the community in very meaningful ways. The winning artist receives a cash award of $20,000. RACC rotates the recognition among four disciplines every year – visual artists, performing artists, literary artists, and media artists. Past Literature Fellows have included Kim Stafford (2008), Craig Lesley (2004), and Michele Glazer (2001).

Guidelines can be downloaded from the RACC website, and all applications must be submitted online atracc.org/grantsonline. To be considered, applicants must submit an “Intent to Apply” form electronically no later than 5:00 pm, April 3, 2013. Applicants are then required to finalize and submit their online application, and upload all supplementary materials electronically through the RACC GrantsOnline system by 5:00 pm, April 10, 2013.

A panel of community representatives with expertise in the field of literature will select the fellowship winner. An artist’s involvement in the community will play a significant role in evaluating each application. In addition, applicants must meet several strict criteria in order to be eligible for this highly competitive award:

  • The applicant must be a professional artist, as recognized by his/her peers, with a minimum of 10 years’ experience in the literary arts.
  • The applicant must have been an Oregon resident for a minimum of 5 years and a current resident of Clackamas, Multnomah, or Washington Counties.
  • The applicant must demonstrate sustained high artistic quality of artmaking.

Other RACC fellows are listed at racc.org/fellows, and they include: Mary Oslund, Obo Addy, Christine Bourdette, Terry Toedtemeier, Jim Blashfield, Michele Glazer, Tomas Svoboda, Keith Scales, Judy Cooke, Michael Brophy, Chel White, Craig Lesley, Thara Memory, Henk Pander, Joanna Priestley, Kim Stafford, Robin Lane, Eric Stotik and Lawrence Johnson.


Nathan Sandberg brings his “Tally” installation to the Portland Building, 2/18 – 3/15

Project Background: Artist Nathan Sandberg has developed a fascination with the repetitive nature of modern life. This fascination began when he started thinking about ways to mark the time he spent performing life’s everyday rote mechanical tasks—putting on socks, brushing teeth, walking out the front door. To both curse and honor the extraordinary amount of time we humans spend on these mundane tasks Sandberg created an installation that pays homage to them.

“The number of times I find myself performing a task as mundane as reaching for my keys or traveling the same routes to and from work is perplexing. As I make these trips I observe others doing the exact same thing and I often wonder if they realize, as I now do, how much time they spend on these tasks. … Time can be recorded as notches on a stick, rings within a tree trunk and ticks on a circle. In Tally I attempt to document the occurrence of a repeated activity that has developed into a routine. The Portland Building is a place of nearly constant business that swells with people on a daily basis, and empties at night. This constant flow of people, goods and information makes the site a superior location for an installation examining and recording time.”

Sandberg’s installation presents the viewer with a wall of large task-marking talismans, or “counting units,” their shape and form inspired by the grade stakes used on construction sites to indicate the rise and fall of elevation. Each stake or counting unit is beautifully crafted by the artist in kiln-cast yellow glass or naturally colored concrete and hung on heat formed steel rings with wrought iron hooks. These unique and enigmatic markers offer a caution to those tempted to trivialize the mundane and allow passers-by to pause and consider the magnitude of their daily unconscious acts.

About the Artist: Nathan Sandberg lives in Portland, Oregon. As well as maintaining an active studio practice he is an Instructor and Technician at the Bullseye Glass Company in NW Portland and has worked as both a production and demonstration Glassblower. Sandberg received his BFA in Glass and Ceramics from Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois.

Viewing Hours & Location: 7 am to 6 pm, Monday – Friday. The Portland Building is located at 1120 SW 5th Avenue in downtown Portland.

For more information on the Portland Building Installation Space series including images, proposals and statements for all the installations since 1994, go to www.racc.org/installationspace.