RACC Blog

RACC’s private sector initiatives continue to grow

Throughout the Portland metro region, businesses are using the arts more than ever before to inspire employees, stimulate innovation and foster creative collaboration. And increasingly, RACC is working to support this powerful intersection between arts and business.

RACC’s workplace giving campaign, Work for Art, engages employees in creative activities while raising contributions on behalf of local nonprofit arts organizations. And through our Business Committee for the Arts (BCA), RACC provides essential services for businesses who support the arts, including Art of Leadership, a board training program, and the Arts Breakfast of Champions, an annual recognition event.

  • Work for Art raised a grand total $912,213 last year – our best campaign ever! Thanks to the generosity of more than 2,000 donors, 75 companies, and everyone who participated in our first annual Battle of the Bands event, Work for Art will be able to distribute larger investments (and a full 100% of the proceeds!) to 100 local arts and culture organizations this fall.

Our 11th annual campaign kicks off this month, chaired by Kregg Arntson, director of corporate social responsibility for Portland General Electric and executive director of the PGE Foundation. Although Work for Art is primarily a workplace giving program, anyone can participate and enjoy the benefits of making a single gift that supports 100 arts and culture organizations in our community. Online at workforart.org.

  • Art of Leadership, established by BCA in 2003, prepares business professionals to serve on the boards of arts and culture organizations. A series of six half-day workshops are led by internationally acclaimed arts consultant George Thorn and other expert speakers. The program also provides opportunities for an internship to observe an arts board, and a “speed dating” event to meet with boards seeking new members.

Registration for the 2016-17 series is now open! The first workshop is slated for October 5, then on future Wednesdays — November 9, December 7, January 4, February 1, and March 1. The $800 tuition fee includes all six workshops, five lunches, and an afternoon graduation reception. For more information visit racc.org/artofleadership. Deadline to apply: 9/26/16.

Coming next spring, RACC will unveil new, advanced-level Art of Leadership workshops specifically designed for current board members to do a deeper dive on board engagement and fundraising issues. Stay tuned!

  • The Arts Breakfast of Champions is scheduled to return to the Portland Art Museum on February 8, 2017. This annual event brings together elected officials, business leaders, and members of the arts community to celebrate and support culture, creativity and innovation in our community. Tickets for the event will be available in November.

To help us expand these programs and build more collaborations between arts organizations and businesses, RACC will convene a visioning session with arts and business leaders in the fall – stay tuned for more information, or contact jhawthorne@racc.org to be added to the invitation list. Also, RACC is currently seeking applications for a new, full-time Business Partner Manager position. For more information on this exciting job opportunity, visit http://bit.ly/2aAPtXV.


Work for Art concludes tenth anniversary campaign

On June 30, RACC concluded its tenth annual Work for Art campaign. And while it will take a few more weeks to count and confirm all of this year’s campaign contributions, one thing is certain: the 2015-16 fundraising drive will break all records for participation and revenue.

Ten years ago Work for Art burst onto the scene raising $447,000, but this year organizers expect to clear more than $900,000, with all proceeds benefiting local arts and culture organizations. Workplace giving campaigns remain the program’s largest source of revenue, with more than 2,000 individuals in 75 companies participating this year. In addition, 30 individuals stepped up with leadership contributions of $1,000 more, and Work for Art’s first annual Battle of the Bands competition added $70,000 to the campaign total in May.

Work for Art has also enjoyed significant exposure during its tenth anniversary, including a generous contribution from Portland General Electric. If you attended the Rose Festival Starlight Parade or Grand Floral Parade this year, you may have seen – and heard – the PGE float saluting Work for Art. Musicians from Metropolitan Youth Symphony (one of Work for Art’s 100 funded arts and culture groups) jammed out atop a colorful larger-than-life guitar. PGE employees have been the top donors to Work for Art for four years running.

The 2015-16 campaign total and top companies will be announced at a special event on August 4. Local arts and business leaders will celebrate outgoing campaign chairs, Mike Golub and Dave Lofland, and applaud Work for Art’s program manager, Kathryn Jackson, who departs this month after 10 years with the organization. Over the last 10 years, Work for Art has raised more than $7.1 million for local nonprofit arts organizations.

The 2016-17 campaign will be chaired by Kregg Arntson, Director of Corporate Social Responsibility for Portland General Electric and the Executive Director of the PGE Foundation.

For more information on Work for Art and the 2016-17 campaign, contact Jeff Hawthorne at jhawthorne@racc.org or call 503.823.5258.


Project grants impact artists and our community

By Sara Farrokhzadian

Summer time is project grant season at RACC and staff is spreading the word about the upcoming “Intent to Apply” deadline on August 3, 2016 at 5:00 p.m. This year $650,000 in funding is available for artistic projects and events that are scheduled to take place in calendar year 2017. Project grant awards range from $1,000 to $7,000 each.

RACC encourages individual artists and nonprofit organizations in Multnomah, Washington and Clackamas Counties to apply.  Successful proposals will involve the creation or presentation of a performance, exhibit, or other work of art that is available to the general public sometime in 2017. There are two categories of project grants: Artistic Focus and Community Participation & Access. For more information on project grant guidelines, please visit racc.culturegrants.org.

RACC project grants support artistic projects in our community

RACC funded 131 project grants for 2016, , supporting a wide range of projects in a variety of disciplines including literature, media arts, dance, multi-discipline and social practice. This funding has provided important opportunities for artists and our community.

Fumi’s Floral Shoppe

From

From “Fumi’s Flora Shoppe”

Chris Parkhurst, a Portland media artist, received a RACC project grant to film a short documentary about 93 year old Fumi Itatmi and the flower shop she and her family have operated in Portland for the last 70 years. Fumi’s Floral Shoppe depicts Portland’s history and transformation through the challenges and change Fumi and her flower shop experienced, including Fumi’s forced placement in an internment camp during World War II. For Parkhurst, the film tells a powerful story of five generations of Japanese women keeping their family and community connected through their flower shop. The film presents the audience with real and tangible experiences from our collective history in Portland.

For Parkhurst, the RACC project grant award has had a huge impact on his art making. “RACC project grant funding allows me to practice my passion of documentary films,” Parkhurst said. Parkhurst has been making documentary film since 2004 and, like many other artists he knows, does not make his living through documentary film making. “I encourage every artist I know who has a project they feel strongly about to apply for the RACC grant,” Parkhurst explained. “Even more than that, if they don’t receive a grant the first time out to make sure to apply again during the next cycle and not to give up.”

Fumi’s Flora Shoppe will premiere in fall 2016.

Artosaur

ChristineMartell_Artosauer_crop

Christine Martell and her Artosauer Project.

Christine Martell, a visual artist based in Hillsboro, received a Community Participation & Access project grant for her Artosaur Project in 2016. The Artosaur, a robotic dinosaur sculpture, is an arts advocate and educator with a mission to show us that art is everywhere. The project took the Artosaur out into the community to hold art making experiences for the public at library events. These art making experiences incorporated a technology component ranging in complexity from simple folding to create book marks with small children to building LED lit vibrating bugs with older children. Martell held all six of her events in Washington County and reached more than 1,800 participants. Martell also incorporated youth volunteers from the Youth Advisory Council to assist with facilitating the events increasing the community reach of her project.

The RACC project grant was instrumental for Martell and her work. “Through the project grant I am reaching very, very different communities than I have in the past.” Martell said. “I used to hold shows in galleries, but through Artosaur, I embed myself where the population is.”

Through the project grant, Martell feels supported as a community based artist. “RACC not only understands community based art, but RACC funds it as well,” she says. Although Martell has completed her RACC-funded project, she has already begun building on her project grant work. Martell and the Artosaur will hold a weekly pop up makerspace at the Tuesday Night Market in Hillsboro this summer.

How to apply

A great first step in the application process is reading the eligibility guidelines available online at racc.culturegrants.org. This will give applicants an opportunity to determine whether they are eligible for a project grant.

Applicants will submit an “Intent to Apply” form online by Wednesday, August 3, 2016 by 5:00 p.m. through racc.culturegrants.org. First time applicants will need to create a new account through the sign up feature and will be able to access the project grant guidelines and forms. The “Intent to Apply” is a simple form that helps to determine basic eligibility before applicants are invited to submit a full proposal.

All applicants will be notified by email within a few days whether they are invited to submit a full proposal, due August 17, 2016 by 5:00 p.m.

Eligible proposals will be grouped by discipline and adjudicated by a panel of community volunteers who have interest and experience in arts and culture programming. For a listing of project grant awards in 2016, visit racc.org/grants.

Awards will be announced in late December.

RACC staff is there to help

RACC staff are committed to making the grants program accessible to all applicants and to support candidates through the application process. Grants staff Helen Daltoso, Ingrid Carlson and Quinn MacNichol are available to assist applicants in a variety of ways.

RACC will host free orientation sessions in July, walking applicants through the guidelines and the process of submitting a competitive application. Applicants can meet grant staff and will have the opportunity to ask questions.

Free Grant Orientations:

Thurs, July 7| 9:00-11:00am
RACC Office (411 NW Park Ave #101 in Portland)
for Nonprofit Organizations

Tues, July 12 | 5:30-7:00pm
North Portland Library (512 N Killingsworth St in Portland)
for All Applicants

Tues, July 19 | 5:30-7:00pm
RACC Office (411 NW Park Ave #101 in Portland)
for Individual Artists

Wed, July 20 | 3:00-5:00pm
RACC Office (411 NW Park Ave #101 in Portland)
for Nonprofit Organizations

Thurs July 21 | 5:30-7:00pm
East Portland Neighborhood Office (1017 NE 117th Ave in Portland)
for All Applicants

Tues, July 26 | 9:00-11:00am
RACC Office (411 NW Park Ave #101 in Portland)
for Individual Artists

If you plan to attend you can register at
https://regionalarts.wufoo.com/forms/2017-project-grant-orientation-registration/

RACC also has a series of online video tutorials that can help guide applicants through the application process—available at http://bit.ly/1l6zBfd.

Parkhurst has noticed RACC’s focus on accessibility. “There are increased resources that are readily available,” said Parkhurst. During his application process, Parkhurst found it helpful to ask questions. “Part of what is instrumental is to ask questions,” he said. “It encourages dialogue between the applicant and the program.”

Martell, a first time project grant recipient, found the orientation sessions provided practical information on how to approach the application. She also submitted her grant application early enough to arrange for staff feedback on her proposal. Her advice to applicants is: “Do everything – attend the orientations, ask questions, and submit your proposal early and get feedback.” Martell feels that the project grant application process she has given her a better understanding of how to obtain funding that will help her as she moves forward.

RACC staff emphasizes that they want to make themselves available to support applicants. If applicants cannot attend the information sessions, have questions, or would like one-on-one support, they can call or email grant staff for assistance. First time applicants should contact Ingrid Carlson at 503-823-5417 or icarlson@racc.org, and returning applicants should contact Helen Daltoso at 503-823-5402 or hdaltoso@racc.org.

RACC also provides technical and translation assistance for applicants who require it. RACC can help with computer access issues and will translate application materials and provide over-the-phone interpretation services when needed. Applicants can contact Quinn MacNichol at 503-823-2928 or qmacnichol@racc.org for technical assistance.

Guidelines and “Intent to Apply” forms are now available at racc.culturegrants.org.


Yelena Roslaya brings “Visual Sound” to the Portland Building, July 5 – August 5

PORTLAND, ORE – Multimedia artist Yelena Roslaya works to represent sound visually. “The idea of visually displaying sound is inspired by my experience with hearing-motion synesthesia, which occurs when one sense triggers another…personally it happens whenever I see implied motion or energy. I want to share this experience with viewers through my installation at the Portland Building and hear their response.”

Roslaya’s first step in this process was the recording of everyday sounds that occur in the Portland Building—people opening doors, conversing with each other, or simply walking down a hallway. Using FL Studio software, those recordings were then translated into graphic wave images which will be displayed in front of a set of three-dimensional forms, or “sound wave sculptures,” inspired by the wave shapes. These large scale ceramic sculptures draw on the Udu drum forms Roslaya has explored in previous work. Even the colors of the glazes on the sculptures will be determined by the corresponding sound’s “color noise” spectrum—violet noise, white noise, red noise, etc. To complete the full experience for the visitor, each of the sculptures will also include a mp3 device that will playback its original source material.

About the artist: Yelena Roslaya is a graduate student at Oregon College of Arts Craft in Portland where she is the Studio Assistant for both the Ceramics and Drawing/Painting Departments. Her work is inspired by the way humans perceive and process sound. Roslaya lives in Battle Ground, Washington, and has shown at multiple venues in both Oregon and Washington.

About the Installation Space:  Each year the Portland Building Installation Space series reserves several exhibition opportunities for students engaged in creative study at the university level. The format and presentation requirements for the “student” installations are identical to those for established professional artists. The Regional Arts & Culture Council created this separate eligibility category to help introduce emerging talents to the world of public art.

Viewing Hours & Location: The Portland Building is located at 1120 SW 5th Avenue in downtown Portland and is open 8 am to 5 pm, Monday – Friday. Visual Sound opens July 5 and runs through August 5, 2016.

For more information on the Portland Building Installation Space, including images, proposals, and statements for all projects dating back to 1994, go to www.racc.org/installationspace.

# # #

The Regional Arts & Culture Council (RACC) provides grants for artists, nonprofit organizations and schools in Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington Counties; manages an internationally acclaimed public art program; raises money and awareness for the arts through Work for Art; convenes forums, networking events and other community gatherings; provides workshops and other forms of technical assistance for artists; and oversees a program to integrate arts and culture into the standard curriculum in public schools through The Right Brain Initiative. RACC values a diversity of artistic and cultural experiences and is working to build a community in which everyone can participate in culture, creativity and the arts. For more information visit racc.org.


Regional Arts & Culture Council elects new board members and officers

PORTLAND, ORE – The Regional Arts & Culture Council (RACC) board of directors has elected Mike Golub board chair for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2016. Mike is the President of Business for the Portland Timbers and has more than 25 years of experience in professional sports marketing and management, including leadership positions with Nike, the Portland Trail Blazers, New York Rangers and the National Basketball Association. For the past two years Mike has co-chaired RACC’s annual Work for Art campaign. He also serves on the board of the Portland Business Alliance, Children’s Cancer Association, Oregon Sports Authority and the Oregon Cultural Trust.

Phillip T. Hillaire has been re-elected vice chair. Hillaire is a member of the Lummi Tribe. He is involved in protecting tribal sovereignty, cultures, arts and traditions. He has coordinated fundraising events for Native Arts and Cultures Foundation, and planned conferences and handled communications for the Affiliated Tribes of the Northwest Indians.

Eileen L. Day has been re-elected treasurer. She became a CPA in 1997, and has experience in financial reporting, development and analyses of key performance indicators for finance and operations, budgeting and forecasting. In 2003 she joined Portland Center Stage as the Finance Director. In 2005, she joined Holmes & Company and has been the audit partner since 2007.

Steve Rosenbaum has been elected secretary. Steve is an independent marketing consultant and the founder of Pop Art, a digital marketing agency. He believes that arts education is critical to the innovation economy, and has served on the boards of City Club of Portland, the Software Association of Oregon, Tech America Oregon, Chess for Success and the Oregon Bus Project.

Other continuing RACC Board members include Nik Blosser, Verlea G. Briggs, Katy A. Brooks, Robert Bucker, Raymond C. Cheung, CPA, Representative Lew Frederick, Debbie Glaze, Osvaldo ‘Ozzie’ Gonzalez, Angela Hult, Dana Ingram, Susheela Jayapal, David R. Lofland, Jr., Linda McGeady, Brenda L. Meltebeke, Joanna Priestley and Shyla M. Spicer.

In addition, four new members have been elected to the RACC board:

  • Parker Lee is president of the design consultancy Compass52, and co-author of The Art of Opportunity. He is a veteran of the technology, entertainment and sports marketing industries. Most recently, Lee was president and executive vice president of business development at XPLANE. He also co-chairs RACC’s Business Committee for the Arts.
  • Anita Menon is the Founder and Artistic Director of the Anjali School of Dance. She is recognized as one of the leading exponents of Bharatanatyam, a classical dance form originating in Southern India. Anita has directed theatrical productions here in Oregon that are Indian adaptations of Classical Western plays by Shakespeare and Agatha Christie.
  • Mitchell Nieman is the Assistant to the City Manager in Milwaukie, Oregon. He liaises the city’s arts committee and manages public affairs, communications, and neighborhood services departments. He has experience managing public and private capital and redevelopment projects and bringing together diverse groups of stakeholders and underrepresented community members.
  • Anita Yap is the founding partner of the MultiCultural Collaborative, a partnership of professionals of color providing consulting services for equity, inclusion and diversity services for non-profits and governments. Her team focuses on authentic community engagement with culturally specific communities, urban design, equity policy, facilitation, strategic planning and organizational development.

Board and staff profiles are available online at http://www.racc.org/about/staff-board.

Eric Hormel and Joe Krumm rotate off the RACC Board on June 30, 2016. RACC greatly appreciates their long and committed service to the organization and the local arts community.

parker-lee600x654 AnitaMenon600x652 AnitaYap_600x651

New RACC board members (from left) Parker Lee, Anita Menon, and Anita Yap.

# # #

The Regional Arts & Culture Council (RACC) provides grants for artists, nonprofit organizations and schools in Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington Counties; manages an internationally acclaimed public art program; raises money and awareness for the arts through Work for Art; convenes forums, networking events and other community gatherings; provides workshops and other forms of technical assistance for artists; and oversees a program to integrate arts and culture into the standard curriculum in public schools through The Right Brain Initiative. RACC values a diversity of artistic and cultural experiences and is working to build a community in which everyone can participate in culture, creativity and the arts. For more information visit racc.org.


Reception on June 21 celebrates 30 years of The Visual Chronicle of Portland

Tuesday, June 21
6:45 – 8:00 p.m.
at the Regional Arts & Culture Council
411 NW Park Avenue, Suite 101
RSVP Salvador Mayoral at smayoral@racc.org

A special collection: As many already know, The Visual Chronicle of Portland is a collection of original works on paper that portray artists’ perceptions of what makes Portland unique. The collection strives to reflect a diversity of populations, artistic disciplines and points of view. It can be viewed as a timepiece that provides a visual and conceptual narrative of greater Portland and is meant to reveal our city’s distinctive and diverse personality. Owned and funded by the City of Portland, the collection has grown to 330 works by nearly 200 different artists since its inception in 1985. RACC displays works from the Chronicle in a variety of public spaces in City of Portland and Multnomah County buildings.

A special purchase: To honor the 30th anniversary of the Visual Chronicle the 2015 selection panel studied the list of artists in the collection to try and identify important artists working in Portland today who might be missing. To work within the program’s modest purchase budget, the panel narrowed their initial list of 36 candidates down to four outstanding artists they felt needed to be included—Avantika Bawa, Calvin Ross Carl, Garrick Imatani and Ralph Pugay. RACC is now pleased to be able to present the works by these four artists that were purchased in 2015 in a special exhibition in our office at 411 NW Park Avenue.  A reception for the exhibition and the anniversary will be held on Tuesday, June 21 at 6:45 pm. (The reception follows an info session for the next Visual Chronicle purchase, for more information https://racc.org/2016/06/15/racc-seeks-submissions-for-the-visual-chronicle-of-portland-2/ )

Avantika Bawa

Coliseum 1  2015, graphite on paper, 24” x 36” (pictured)

Avantika Bawa

Coliseum 1,  2015, graphite on paper, 21 1/4” x 36 1/4”

Avantika completed two drawings in her graphic style that were informed visually and conceptually by Portland’s Veterans Memorial Coliseum, a premier jewel of International Style architecture in the city. “Given the light [the Coliseum] has recently received, I am very interested in doing a series of drawings based on this remarkable building.”

Calvin Ross Carl

The Copper Ribbons on Michael’s Grave, 2015, acrylic on paper, 20” x 26” (pictured)

Calvin Ross Carl

Finally You Can Complete Me (Safe Honest Repair), 2015, acrylic on paper, 20” x 26”

“The pattern painting is appropriated from the ribbons from our own beloved or bemoaned (depending upon who you ask) Portland building…The text painting has text pulled from a business called the VIP Collision Center on the corner of MLK and NE Rosa Parks. The words “Safe Honest Repairs” have been painted on that building’s windows for 5-6 years. I have been driving by the building for many years and those words always catch my eye…Why these two paintings together? The Portland Building is oddly beautiful, and it is a landmark worth saving, but it is in need of major modernization and rehabilitation. This immediately made these two disparate ideas connect. The greatness of the Portland Building being saved by such a simple, thoughtful promise of “Safe Honest Repair”.

Garrick Imatani

Toward A Future Plan | Mirror | Failure | Trap, 2016, mirrored acrylic and photographs mounted on inkjet print, 19 ½” x 24 ½” (pictured)

Garrick Imatani

“Even after it’s declaration as a city, Portland’s margins have fluctuated over time just like the Willamette River which currently splits the city into its eastern and western halves. LIDAR mapping imagery shows that 13,000-15,000 years ago during the Missoula Floods, where you are standing would have been submerged under water. The city is a blip in time. We live at the bottom of a lake.”  Garrick goes on to describe the photos that intersect with his vibrant blue map of the Willamette: “I came across archival photographs of the bombing of Portland City Hall in 1970 in police surveillance files. I made contact prints from 8×10 photographs documenting the Hall’s blown-out window frames…these contact prints were cut down to containers—frames of frames—then overlaid onto the river as imagined those thousands of years ago…This compression of geography and political history is a nod to time and the ongoing development of the city, which can either reflect or elevate what has evaporated.”

Ralph Pugay

 Lonely Traveler (Traveling pilot waiting to disembark at PDX), 2015,  Acrylic on yupo, 11” x 14” (pictured)

Pugay_VC

Obstructed Motility (Clerk experiencing astral projection at Portland Cash & Carry), 2015, Acrylic on paper, 12” x 16”

Lonely Traveler was inspired by a pilot that I saw as I was leaving an airplane on a flight back to Portland. He remained seated in first class as many of the passengers were leaving the plane. I assume that he was there to continue on to the plane’s next destination…As I walked by, I pondered if there was a certain amount of discomfort for the pilot as he sat in the passenger seat. I am drawn to the ambiguous nature of his behavior, and presumably of others who might have witnessed this.”


RACC seeks submissions for the “Visual Chronicle of Portland”

The Regional Arts & Culture Council (RACC) is seeking works on paper—prints, drawings, paintings on paper and photographs—to purchase for the Visual Chronicle of Portland collection. To learn more about the submission guidelines, click hereDeadline for submissions is Monday, July 25, 2016.

The Visual Chronicle of Portland is a city-owned collection of original works on paper that portray artists’ perceptions of what makes Portland, Oregon, unique. Since its inception in 1985, the Chronicle has grown to 330 works by nearly 200 different artists. Works are displayed in publicly accessible spaces in City of Portland and Multnomah County buildings.

The Chronicle reflects a diversity of populations, artistic disciplines and points of view. The collection can be viewed as a timepiece that provides a visual narrative of greater Portland, and is meant to reveal our city’s distinctive and diverse personality as seen and interpreted by artists who are intimately familiar with the region. The Visual Chronicle represents a living archive, and RACC is committed to engaging and expanding the communities of artists and the range of artistic and cultural expression that it represents.

For more information and to view images and details of the entire collection, visit http://bit.ly/visualchronicle

This year’s purchase decisions will be based on how well the work matches the purpose and spirit of the Visual Chronicle—conveying perceptions of what makes Portland unique. We encourage work that documents, describes, or evokes areas, communities, and issues that are under-represented in the Chronicle. The bridges, the Rose Parade, Washington Park and other Portland icons that come immediately to mind are all well represented, but the collection has fewer works that portray people and places that exist beyond the central city areas. While no absolute boundaries or subjects are mandated or excluded, we hope to add range to the Chronicle and better represent vital neighborhoods, communities, and artists that contribute to an equitable view of Portland.

An independent volunteer panel of artists, curators and historians will select artwork for purchase in a two-part process. First, the panel will review digital images that are submitted. Artists whose works are selected for further consideration will be asked to deliver the actual artwork to RACC for a first-hand review and final selection. The panel reserves the right to purchase work from artists who do not submit work, and is not obligated to spend the entire 2016-2017 budget of $20,000.

Works on paper—prints, drawings, paintings on paper and photographs—from professional artists familiar with Portland are eligible. For more information about guidelines, visit the RACC website at https://racc.org/resources/listings/racc-opportunity-call-for-artists-the-visual-chronicle-of-portland/, or contact program manager Kristin Calhoun at kcalhoun@racc.org or 503-823-5401.

For artists who are new to the submission process, unfamiliar with preparing digital images, or would like to get additional background on the Chronicle, RACC is hosting two free information sessions: Tuesday, June 21 from 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. at RACC (411 NW Park Avenue, Suite 101) and Thursday, June 23 from 6:00-7:00 p.m. at East Portland Neighborhood Office (1017 NE 117th Ave, Portland, OR 97220). Contact Salvador Mayoral at smayoral@racc.org to reserve a spot.

RACC is also hosting a free reception following the June 21st info session to highlight purchases made for the Visual Chronicle last year. Work by Avantika Bawa, Calvin Ross Carl, Garrick Imatani and Ralph Pugay will be on display, and Avantika Bawa and Ralph Pugay will be on hand to discuss their work. The event is free and open to the public, Thursday, June 21 at 6:45 p.m. at RACC.

To learn more about the submission guidelines, click here. The deadline for submissions is Monday, July 25, 2016.


RACC seeks submissions for the “Visual Chronicle of Portland”

PORTLAND, ORE — The Regional Arts & Culture Council (RACC) is seeking works on paper—prints, drawings, paintings on paper and photographs—to purchase for the Visual Chronicle of Portland collection. Deadline for submissions is Monday, July 25, 2016.

The Visual Chronicle of Portland is a city-owned collection of original works on paper that portray artists’ perceptions of what makes Portland, Oregon, unique. Since its inception in 1985, the Chronicle has grown to 330 works by nearly 200 different artists. Works are displayed in publicly accessible spaces in City of Portland and Multnomah County buildings.

The Chronicle reflects a diversity of populations, artistic disciplines and points of view. The collection can be viewed as a timepiece that provides a visual narrative of greater Portland, and is meant to reveal our city’s distinctive and diverse personality as seen and interpreted by artists who are intimately familiar with the region. The Visual Chronicle represents a living archive, and RACC is committed to engaging and expanding the communities of artists and the range of artistic and cultural expression that it represents.

For more information and to view images and details of the entire collection, visit http://bit.ly/visualchronicle

This year’s purchase decisions will be based on how well the work matches the purpose and spirit of the Visual Chronicle—conveying perceptions of what makes Portland unique. We encourage work that documents, describes, or evokes areas, communities, and issues that are under-represented in the Chronicle. The bridges, the Rose Parade, Washington Park and other Portland icons that come immediately to mind are all well represented, but the collection has fewer works that portray people and places that exist beyond the central city areas. While no absolute boundaries or subjects are mandated or excluded, we hope to add range to the Chronicle and better represent vital neighborhoods, communities, and artists that contribute to an equitable view of Portland.

An independent volunteer panel of artists, curators and historians will select artwork for purchase in a two-part process. First, the panel will review digital images that are submitted. Artists whose works are selected for further consideration will be asked to deliver the actual artwork to RACC for a first-hand review and final selection. The panel reserves the right to purchase work from artists who do not submit work, and is not obligated to spend the entire 2016-2017 budget of $20,000.

Works on paper—prints, drawings, paintings on paper and photographs—from professional artists familiar with Portland are eligible. For more information about guidelines, visit the RACC website at https://racc.org/resources/listings/racc-opportunity-call-for-artists-the-visual-chronicle-of-portland/, or contact program manager Kristin Calhoun at kcalhoun@racc.org or 503-823-5401.

For artists who are new to the submission process, unfamiliar with preparing digital images, or would like to get additional background on the Chronicle, RACC is hosting two free information sessions: Tuesday, June 21 from 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. at RACC (411 NW Park Avenue, Suite 101) and Thursday, June 23 from 6:00-7:00 p.m. at East Portland Neighborhood Office (1017 NE 117th Ave, Portland, OR 97220). Contact Salvador Mayoral at smayoral@racc.org to reserve a spot.

RACC is also hosting a free reception following the June 21st info session to highlight purchases made for the Visual Chronicle last year. Work by Avantika Bawa, Calvin Ross Carl, Garrick Imatani and Ralph Pugay will be on display, and Avantika Bawa and Ralph Pugay will be on hand to discuss their work. The event is free and open to the public, Thursday, June 21 at 6:45 p.m. at RACC.

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Ralph Pugay, Lonely Traveler, 2015, acrylic on yupo

Ralph Pugay, Lonely Traveler, 2015, acrylic on yupo

Susana Santos, City Dwellers, 1993, watercolor & gouache

Susana Santos, City Dwellers, 1993, watercolor & gouache

The Regional Arts & Culture Council (RACC) provides grants for artists, nonprofit organizations and schools in Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington Counties; manages an internationally acclaimed public art program; raises money and awareness for the arts through Work for Art; convenes forums, networking events and other community gatherings; provides workshops and other forms of technical assistance for artists; and oversees a program to integrate arts and culture into the standard curriculum in public schools through The Right Brain Initiative. RACC values a diversity of artistic and cultural experiences and is working to build a community in which everyone can participate in culture, creativity and the arts. For more information visit racc.org.